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close this book Forestry training manual Inter-America Region
View the document Information collection & exchange
View the document Acknowledgements
View the document Trainer guidelines
Open this folder and view contents Training program overview
View the document Forestry observation guide for site visit
Open this folder and view contents Getting ready
View the document Conducting the training program
View the document Weekly evaluation form
View the document Session I day one
View the document Daily schedule for technical training
View the document Session II special projects
View the document Session III The forest of the world, peace corps forestry goals, the individual volunteers' roles
View the document Session IV Language class
View the document Session V Exercise I: Record keeping
View the document Session VI Exercise II
View the document Session VII Flowers, seeds, the beginning
View the document Session VIII Spanish language class
View the document Session IX Non-verbal communication
View the document Session X Basic site selection, planning and layout of a nursery
View the document Session XI Spanish language class
View the document Session XII Cultural values
View the document Session XIII Soil preparation, seed bed sowing, and reproduction by clippings
View the document Session XIV Spanish language
View the document Session XV Communication through illustration
View the document Session XVI Fertilizers, watering and containers
View the document Session XVII Spanish language
View the document Session XVIII Protection and record keeping
View the document Session XIX Individual interviews
View the document Session XX Planting trees
View the document Session XXI Spanish language session
View the document Session XXII Introduction to extension
View the document Session XXIII The principals of pruning and thinning
View the document Session XXIV Spanish language
View the document Session XXV Volunteer's role as an extensionist
View the document Session XXVI Pacing, plane table, rustic transit and compass
View the document Session XXVIII Spanish language
View the document Session XVIII Forestry extension
View the document Session XXIX Forest menstruation
View the document Session XXX Spanish language
Open this folder and view contents Session XXXI Working with groups as an extension worker
View the document Session XXXIII Spanish language
View the document Session XXXIV Lesson plan and use of visual aids in teaching
View the document Session XXV Small research projects
View the document Session XXXVI Individual interviews
View the document Session XXXVII Soils
View the document Session XXXVIII Spanish language
View the document Session XXXIX Community analysis introduction
View the document Session XL Soil erosion
View the document Session XLI Spanish language
View the document Session XLIII Watershed management
View the document Session XLIV Spanish language
View the document Session XLV Review of expectations - mid way
View the document Session XLVI Spanish language
View the document Session XLVII Species report
Open this folder and view contents Session XLVIII Forestry issues
View the document Session XLIX Spanish language
View the document Session L Field trip overview
View the document Session LI Ecology teams give presentations
View the document Session LII Individual interviews
View the document Session LIII Review of field trips
View the document Session LIV Project planning: goal setting
View the document Session LV Spanish language
View the document Session LVI Resources
View the document Session LVII Compost heap - insect collection - light gaps
View the document Session LVIII Spanish language
View the document Session LIX Cultural shock - are we ready for it?
View the document Session LX Grafting and fruit trees
View the document Session LXI Spanish language
View the document Session LXII Professional approaches to interaction with host country officials
View the document Session LXIII Final interviews
View the document Session LXIV Graduation

Session IV Language class

Total Time: 1 1/2 hours

Goals:

- To provide trainees with language classes to hold language capabilities at entry level or if possible, increase language proficiency.

- To integrate technical language as part of language training.

Overview:

In this first language class, it is important for teachers to set the ground rules for class. Basically classes are to be conversational, but grammar will also be stressed. Proper pronunciation of words will also be stressed.

Procedure

Time

Activities

1 1/2 hours

1. Teachers will be given the activities of each session. They will discuss in Spanish the activities of proceeding sessions.

 

2. Teachers will go over vocabulary list for each day helping participants with pronunciation and putting vocabulary words into sentences using correct grammar.

Vocabulary list

Afforestation - reprobacion forestal; aforestacion

Tree class - classe de arbor

Ecology - ecologia

Flower - flor

Forest - mante, bosque

Forestry - tecnica forestal, dasonomia

Fruit - fruta, fruto

Leaf - hoja

Nut - nuez

Reforestation - reforestation

Root - raiz

Seed - semillia

Site - sitio

Tree stem - tronco, tallo

Tree - arbol wood - madera

Feedback and Journal Writing

Total Time: 1 hour 45 minutes

Goals:

- To review how to give and receive feedback;

- To learn more about ourselves;

- To become more skillful in obtaining and understanding information about the effectiveness of our behavior;

- To become more sensitive to our reactions to others and the consequences of these reactions;

- Participants will understand the importance of keeping a journal.

Materials:

- Flip charts, marker pens, tape, note books with tabs for journals.

Exercise I Feedback

Total Time: 1 hour

Overview

The purpose of this exercise is to remind participants that although they may have had lectures and some practice in feedback, that giving timely, skillful feedback needs to be practiced.

Procedures

Time

Activities

5 minutes

1. Trainer should acknowledge that everyone of the trainees has been through feedback practice at the CAST, CREST, or Staging and that many may have had an introduction to feedback even earlier.

5 minutes

2. Ask individuals to jot down as many feedback rules as they can remember off the top of their heads.

15 minutes

3. Trainer now produces newsprint with the following rules;

FEEDBACK RULES

1. It is honest and frank rather than diplomatic or subtle. It is true reporting your real feelings and reactions to the behavior of another person. This implies that you are aware of your reactions and are willing to run the risk of possible rejection by sharing them with the other person.

2. It is specific rather than general. To he told that one is dominating will probably he as useful as to he told that: "Just now you were not listening to what the others said, but I felt I had to agree with your arguments or face attack from you. "

3. It is focused on behavior rather than on the person. It is important that we refer to what a person does rather than to what we think or imagine he is. Thus we might say that a person "talked more than anyone else in this meeting" rather than that he is a "loudmouth". The former allows for the possibility of change; the latter implies a fixed personality trait.

4. It takes into account the needs of the receiver of feedback. Feeaback can be destructive when it serves only our own needs and fails to consider the needs of the person on the receiving end. It should be given to help, not hurt. We too often give feedback because it makes us feel hefter or gives us a psychological advantage.

5. It is directed toward behavior which the receiver can do something about. Frustration is only increased when a person is reminded of some shortcomings over which he has no control or a physical characteristic which he can do nothing about.

6. It is solicited, rather than imposed. Feedback is most useful when the receiver himself has formulated the kind of question which one can answer either by observing him or through actively seeking (soliciting) feedback.

7. It involves sharing of information rather than giving advice. By sharing information, we leave a person free to decide for himself, in accordance with his own goals, needs, etc. When we give advice we tell him what to do, and to some degree take away his freedom to decide for himself.

8. It is well-timed. In general, immediate feedback is most useful (depending of course, on the person's readiness to hear it, support available from others, etc.). The reception and use of feedback involves many possible emotional reactions. Excellent feedback presented at an inappropriate time may do more harm than good.

9. It involves the amount of information that receiver can use rather than the amount we would like to give. To overload a person with feedback is to reduce the possibility that he may be able to use what he receives effectively. when we give more than can he used, we are more often than not satisfying some need of our own rather than helping the other person.

10. The feedback should he real, perhaps based on the record keeping exercise that they took part in. This would help set a climate of openness. It is also important to model positive feedback.