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close this book Measuring drought and drought impacts in Red Sea Province
View the document Acknowledgements
View the document A Note on Orthography and Other Conventions
View the document Executive summary of the research
Open this folder and view contents 1. Introduction to Red Sea Province
Open this folder and view contents 2. Measuring drought and food insecurity in Red Sea province: in 1987 and 1988: a technique for Pthe rapid assessment of large areas. Roy Cole
Open this folder and view contents 3. Drowght, food stress, and the flood and rainfall record for Red Sea Province. Roy Cole
Open this folder and view contents 4. Drought, the market, and the impact of food aid in Red Sea Province, 1980 to 1989. Roy Cole
Open this folder and view contents 5. Nutritional status of children in Red Sea Province, November 1985 to November 1987. Mary Cole and Roy Cole
Open this folder and view contents 6. The nutritional status of children in Red Sea Province, July-October 1989: a supplement to the November 1985-November 1987 results. Mary L. Cole and Roy Cole
Open this folder and view contents 7. Land tenure, agricultural labour, drought and food stress in the Gash, Gash Dai and Tokar agricultural areas. Roy Cole
Open this folder and view contents 8. Changes in tree density on five sites in Red Sea Province: early 1960s to 1989. Roy Cole
Open this folder and view contents 11. Conclusion
View the document Technical glossary
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Acknowledgements

Working in the Sudan during the two years of my tenure as Research Officer for Oxfam Port Sudan has been a challenge. There were many times, particularly during the latter part of my tour, when we could not find food in the market for our field trips not to mention for our daily subsistence. I owe a debt of gratitude to my staff for their willingness to continue to work in such conditions and to subsist on so little. Without their hard work and daily sacrifices none of this work would have been possible.

It has been a rare privilege to work for Oxfam. There are few other organisation in the world like it in terms of its responsible, hardworking staff and its unique relationship with the poorest of the poor. The cooperation and important contributions to the papers in this collection by the Sudanese government is much appreciated. A particular word of thanks is due the National Water Corporation, the Gash Board, the Tokar Delta Board, the Meteorological Department, and the Sudan Survey Department.

I would like to thank the following people for their comments on earlier drafts of these papers: David de Pury, Sam Gonda, Olivia Graham, Andy Jeans, Adrian Rayson, Ilona Sulikova, and Willie Wint. Particular thanks goes to those who attended three days of discussion of the penultimate draft: Safaa Agib, Mary Cole, Fatima Gebreil, Maurice Herson, John Low, Margaret McEwan, Peter Tilley, and Martin Walsh. I would also like to thank David Bourn for his insightful comments over the last two years, June Stephen for document support, and Randy Wilson for computer support. The views expressed in this book are those of the author and not necessarily those of Oxfam.

I hope that our contribution will be of use in understanding drought, food stress, culture, and economy in Red Sea Province and will contribute circumventing future emergencies.