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close this bookAmputation for War Wounds (ICRC, 30 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentFOREWORD
View the documentINTRODUCTION
View the documentPATHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF THE LIMB INJURY
View the documentOPERATIVE CONSIDERATIONS
View the documentPHYSIOTHERAPY AND REHABILITATION
View the documentTHE MYOPLASTIC AMPUTATIONS (Cases A, B and C)
View the documentSPECIFIC AMPUTATIONS IN RELATION TO WAR WOUNDS
View the documentSTUMP REVISION
View the documentREFERENCES

THE MYOPLASTIC AMPUTATIONS (Cases A, B and C)

In this text, three myoplastic amputations are described for three levels of amputation (figs); each involves the whole muscle (as opposed to transected muscle) being left at the end of the operation. They fulfil the operative objectives described above as they take the pattern of injury and the swelling of muscle between amputation and delayed closure into account. Additional advantages are: the resulting stump may be longer; stump infection and subsequent breakdown is minimised because the bone section is covered by muscle; the skin flaps, often determined by the injury, are closed independently; the myoplasty can be left exposed when there is insufficient skin to close the stump (figure 9).

There is the theoretical advantage of the myoplasty bringing proprioception to the stump.