Cover Image
close this bookBasic Rules of International Humanitarian Law (ICRC, 26 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentForeword
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentComponents of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement
View the documentFundamental Principles of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement
View the documentThe distinctive emblem and its value
View the documentFundamental Rules of International Humanitarian Law applicable in Armed Conflicts
View the documentSome Rules of International Humanitarian Law applicable for First Aiders
View the documentMedical Personnel
View the documentSome examples of tasks in which First Aiders could be involved during a conflict
View the documentConclusion
View the documentBibliography
View the documentBack Cover

Components of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement

The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement consists of three components. They are:

- The National Societies (one in each country)
- The International Committee of the Red Cross
- The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies.

National Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

There is today a National Red Cross or Crescent Society in almost every country of the world.

Membership is open to everyone and services are provided on the sole criterion of need.

National Societies' activities are as varied as the countries they serve. They include emergency relief, health services and social assistance to individuals and communities, first aid courses for the public, training of nursing personnel, blood programmes and youth programmes.

In wartime, Societies serve as auxiliaries to the army medical services, care for military wounded and sick, and aid prisoners, refugees and civilian internees.

Societies must fulfil stringent conditions to achieve recognition by the ICRC and obtain Federation membership. Among them: respect of the Fundamental Principles that include humanity, impartiality, neutrality. They must also be recognized by their governments as voluntary aid societies, auxiliaries to the public authorities.

International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)

A private, non-political, independent institution.

The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) acts as a neutral intermediary in humanitarian matters during international conflicts, civil wars and internal disturbances.

It provides protection and assistance to both military and civilian victims of conflicts - to prisoners of war and civilian detainees, to the war wounded and the shipwrecked and to civilian populations in occupied or enemy territory.

It also visits political detainees.

The ICRC's role during conflicts is defined in the four Geneva Conventions of 1949 and their Additional Protocols. The Committee, promoter and guardian of these international treaties, works for their development and worldwide dissemination.

Financing:

Voluntary contributions from governments, National Societies, other international institutions and private donations

Foundation:

1863

Headquarters:

Geneva, Switzerland

The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

The object of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies is to prevent and alleviate human suffering through the activities of National Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and so contribute to peace.

- The Federation encourages the creation and development of National Societies in all countries of the world.

- It advises and assists National Societies in the development of their services to the community.

- It organizes and co-ordinates international relief for victims of natural disasters, often launching worldwide appeals for aid. It also promotes the adoption of national disaster preparedness plans.

The Federation is the permanent liaison body between National Societies and acts as their spokesman and representative internationally.

Financing:

Annual dues from member Societies and voluntary contributions for relief and development

Foundation:

1919

Headquarters:

Geneva, Switzerland