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close this bookCommunicable Disease Control in Emergencies - A Field Manual (WHO - OMS, 2003, 223 p.)
close this folderCHAPTER 1: RAPID ASSESSMENT
View the document(introduction...)
View the document1.1 OBJECTIVES OF A RAPID ASSESSMENT
View the document1.2 COMPOSITION OF THE TEAM
View the document1.3 METHODS OF DATA COLLECTION
View the document1.4 SURVEY & SAMPLING METHODS
View the document1.5 DATA TO BE COLLECTED
View the document1.6 ANALYSIS AND PRESENTATION OF RESULTS

1.6 ANALYSIS AND PRESENTATION OF RESULTS

The rapid assessment report must be:

Clear

Decision-makers or staff of local, national and international organizations whose actions depend on the results of the rapid assessment may not be trained in epidemiology. User-friendly language and graphs make complex data and trends easier to understand.

Standardized

Results should be presented according to a standard format so they can be compared with other assessments.

Action-oriented and prioritized

Clear recommendations should be made to implementing organizations, giving highest priority needs.

Widely distributed

Copies of the report should be distribute. to all organizations involved in the emergency response.

Timely

The assessment and report should be finalized and distributed as quickly as possible, preferably within 3-4 days. Donors are often under political pressure in the first few days after an emergency to demonstrate support by their government and have access to funds. They must have data to base their decisions on funding priorities.

1.6.1 FURTHER READING

Assefa F et al. Malnutrition and mortality in Kohistan district, Afghanistan, April 2001. JAMA, 2001, 286:2723-2728.

Gessner BD. Mortality rates, causes of death, and health status among displaced and resident populations of Kabul, Afghanistan. JAMA, 1994, 272:382-385.

Epi Info. Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. Available from http//www.cdc.gov/epiinfo.

EpiData. The EpiData Association, Odense, Denmark. Available from http://www.epidata.dk.

Henderson RH, Sundaresan T. Cluster sampling to assess immunization coverage: a review of experience with a simplified sampling method. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 1982, 60:253-260.

Lwanga SK, Lemeshow S. Sample size determination in health studies: a practical manual. Geneva, World Health Organization, 1991.

Malilay J, Flanders WD, Brogan D. A modified cluster-sampling method for post-disaster rapid assessment of needs. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 1996, 74:399-405.

Porter JDH, van Look FL, Devaux A. Evaluation of two Kurdish refugee camps in Iran, May 1991: the value of cluster sampling in producing priorities and policy. Disasters, 1993, 17:341-347.

Rapid health assessment protocols for emergencies. Geneva, World Health Organization, 1999.

Roberts L, Despines M. Mortality in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Lancet, 1999, 353(9171):2249-2250.

Roberts L. Mortality in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo: results from eleven mortality surveys. Final draft. New York, International Rescue Committee, 2001 (http://intranet.theirc.org/docs/mortII_report_small.pdf; http://intranet.theirc.org/docs/mortII_graphs.pdf; http://intranet.theirc.org/docs/mortII_map.pdf; http://intranet.theirc.org/docs/mortII_exec.pdf, accessed 14 November 2002).

Rothenberg RB et al. Observations on the application EPI cluster survey methods for estimating disease incidence. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 1985, 63:93-99.