Cover Image
close this bookTraining Manual in Combatting Childhood Communicable Diseases Part I (Peace Corps, 1985, 579 pages)
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View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentIntroduction
close this folderTrainer's guide
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View the documentAttachment A: Technical health training needs assessment
close this folderModule 1: Climate setting and assessment
close this folderSession 1: Sharing perceptions of health education
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View the documentTrainer Attachment 1A: Suggested symbols for sharing perceptions exercise
close this folderSession 2: General assessment
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View the documentHandout 2A: Pretest
View the documentHandout 2B: Pretest answer sheet
close this folderSession 3: Defining the training course objectives
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View the documentHandout 3A: Self-assessment worksheet
close this folderSession 4: Training program evaluation
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View the documentHandout 4A: Training program evaluation
close this folderModule 2: Primary health care
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close this folderSession 5: Primary health care
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View the documentHandout 5A: Shattuck lecture - Health care in the developing world: Problems of scarcity and choice
View the documentHandout 5B: Water supply and health in developing countries: Selective primary health care revisited
View the documentHandout 5C: Selective primary health care
close this folderSession 6: Health care delivery systems
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View the documentHandout 6C : Understanding traditional medicine
View the documentTrainer Attachment 6A: Primary health care worksheet
View the documentSession 7: The role of the peace corps volunteer in primary health care in primary health care
close this folderSession 8: Factors affecting health
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View the documentTrainer Attachment 8A : The story of Ibrahim
View the documentTrainer Attachment 8B : But why ...?
View the documentTrainer Attachment 8C : The chain of causes
View the documentTrainer Attachment 8D: Roles and setting for role play on traditional and modern health systems
close this folderModule 3: Community analysis and involvement
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close this folderSession 9: Deciding what to learn about the community
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View the documentHandout 9A: The Keeprah holistic model
View the documentHandout 9B: A community diagnosis what you might learn about your community
close this folderSession 10: Methods for learning about the community
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View the documentHandout 10A: Four types of interview questions
View the documentHandout 10B: Suggestions for gathering information
View the documentHandout 10C: Types and sources of information on the community
View the documentTrainer Attachment 10A: Role play #1: The PCV and a local mother
View the documentTrainer Attachment 10B: Role play #2: The PCV and the town elder
View the documentTrainer Attachment 10C: Appropriate and inappropriate techniques for informal interviewing
View the documentSession 11: Learning about the community
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close this folderSession 13: Survey and disease surveillance
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View the documentHandout 13A: Disease surveillance procedures
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View the documentTrainer Attachment 13A: Defining survey and surveillance
View the documentTrainer Attachment 13B: Definition of rates
View the documentTrainer Attachment 13C: Survey methodology
View the documentTrainer Attachment 13D: Sample out-patient register
View the documentTrainer Attachment 13E: Examples of surveillance forms
View the documentTrainer Attachment 13F: Visualization of numerical data
close this folderSession 14: Working with the community
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View the documentHandout 14A: Questions for evaluation community participation*
View the documentHandout 14B: Skills for development facilitators
View the documentHandout 14C: Helping the people to organize
View the documentHandout 14D: Motivating the community: An immunization example
View the documentHandout 14E: How can participation be organized?
View the documentTrainer Attachment 14A: Factors affecting participation in rural development projects
close this folderSession 15: Working as a counterpart
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View the documentHandout 15A: Working style inventory
View the documentHandout 15B: Continuum of volunteer helping/work styles
View the documentHandout 15C: The OFPISA problem solving model
View the documentTrainer Attachment 15A: Style analysis
close this folderModule 4: Health education
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View the documentBehavioral objectives
close this folderSession 16: Introduction to health education
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View the documentHandout 16A: Introduction to health education
View the documentHandout 16B: The health education process
View the documentHandout 16C: Health education problem
View the documentTrainer Attachment 16A: The aims of health education
View the documentTrainer Attachment 16B: Sample solution to the health education problem
close this folderSession 17: Identifying and analyzing priority health problems
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View the documentHandout 17A: Defining the health problem
View the documentHandout 17B: Health problem analysis worksheet
View the documentTrainer Attachment 17A: Selecting important health problems
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View the documentTrainer Attachment 17C: Indentifying tee target groups for health education
close this folderSession 18: Writing objectives for health education
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View the documentHandout 18A: Setting a project goal and objectives
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View the documentTrainer Attachment 18A: Examples of complete and incomplete project objectives
View the documentTrainer Attachment 18B: Examples of program, project and health education objectives
close this folderSession 19: Selecting health education strategies
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View the documentHandout 19A: Health education strategies
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View the documentHandout 19C: Suggestions for selecting health education strategies
close this folderSession 20: Developing a health education project plan
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View the documentHandout 20A: Planning a community health project
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View the documentTrainer Attachment 20A: The bamboo bridge activity
View the documentTrainer Attachment 20B: Instruction for conducting hollow squares activity
close this folderSession 21: Monitoring health education projects
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View the documentHandout 21A: Field monitoring and evaluation of communication campaign
View the documentTrainer Attachment 21A: Monitoring and evaluating performance
View the documentTrainer Attachment 21B: Checklist for monitoring work performance diarrhoea treatment service
View the documentTrainer Attachment 21C: Examples of items to monitor
close this folderSession 22: Evaluation of health education projects
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View the documentHandout 22A: Criteria for the evaluation of strategies
View the documentHandout 22B: Evaluation worksheet
close this folderSession 23: Adult learning and nonformal education techniques
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View the documentHandout 23A: The experiential learning cycle
View the documentHandout 23B: Using pictures to stimulate discussion
View the documentHandout 23C: Guidelines for using group discussion
View the documentHandout 23D: Guidelines for demonstration
View the documentHandout 23E: Training techniques
View the documentTrainer Attachment 23A: Role play on how adults learn best
View the documentTrainer Attachment 23B: Deciding when id use experiential learning
View the documentTrainer Attachment 23C: Can puppets be effective communicators?
View the documentTrainer Attachment 23D: ''Love him and make him learn''
View the documentTrainer Attachment 23E: Some thoughts on the use of non-formal education in the real world
View the documentTrainer Attachment 23F: Comparison of teacher-centered and learner-centered education approach
close this folderSession 24: Selecting and using visual aids
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View the documentHandout 24A: Ways visual aids help people learn and remember
View the documentHandout 24B: Why pictures fail to convey ideas
View the documentHandout 24C: Design considerations
View the documentHandout 24D: Using pictures to communicate effectively
View the documentHandout 24E: Using visual aids
View the documentTrainer Attachment 24A: Why use visual aids?
View the documentTrainer Attachment 24B: Tanzania - Villagers teaching us to teach them
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close this folderSession 25: Health education through mass media
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View the documentHandout 25A: Promoting ORT: integrating mass media print and visual aids
View the documentHandout 25B: Development campaigns in rural Tanzania
View the documentHandout 25C: The promotion of breastfeeding and proper weaning practices in the Ivory Coast
View the documentHandout 25D: Guidelines for readings and presentations
View the documentTrainer Attachment 25A: Communications: A potent force for change
View the documentTrainer Attachment 25B: Making print materials easier to read
View the documentTrainer Attachment 25C: Example of planning for a picture series
View the documentTrainer Attachment 25D: Radio instructional programs: Some practical guidelines for scriptwriters and planners
View the documentTrainer Attachment 25E: Concept development (PSA's)
View the documentTrainer Attachment 25F: Developing print materials for nonliterates
View the documentTrainer Attachment 25G: The process 0f writing materials
View the documentTrainer Attachment 25H: Radio programme planning guide
close this folderSession 26: Adapting and pretesting techniques and materials
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View the documentHandout 26A: Visual aids: Do they help or hinder?
View the documentHandout 26B: Pretest report form
View the documentTrainer Attachment 26A: Tracing techniques to adapt visual aids
View the documentTrainer Attachment 26B: Role play on pretesting pictures
close this folderSession 27: Practicing and evaluating health education session
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View the documentHandout 27A: Guidelines for practice sessions
View the documentHandout 27B: Session plan worksheet
View the documentHandout 27C: Evaluation of practice session date
View the documentHandout 27D: Session preparation checklist
View the documentTrainer Attachment 27A: Sample session plan
View the documentSession 28: Planning and implementing a health day

Behavioral objectives

By the end of the training, participants will be able to:

1. Plan and implement a local community investigation and analysis that includes:

- gathering information on at least two subsystems of the community using the KEEPHRAH Model as a basis

- use of at least three information-gathering techniques identified and practiced during Sessions 9 and 10, and

- group discussion of the relationship between the health subsystem and the other subsystems of the community.

2. Define the terms survey and surveillance as described in Session 13 and explain the types and usefulness of information that can be gathered by these two systems.

3. In a simulated problematic community situation, correctly describe at least three techniques to motivate community participation as discussed in Session 14.

4. Identify potential job-related and interpersonal problems associated with working as a counterpart, and develop a solution to at least one of those problems using a problem solving model.