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close this bookTeach English Prevent AIDS (Peace Corps)
close this folderUnit 1: Values
View the documentLesson 1
View the documentLesson 2
View the documentLesson 3
View the documentLesson 4

Lesson 2

AIDS Information: AIDS is caused by a virus which destroys the body's ability to fight disease. The virus is called the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and it is transmitted mainly through unprotected sex. Semen and vaginal fluids contain white blood cells which can be infected with HIV. In Cameroon, as in most of Africa, 75 - 90 % of people with AIDS became infected with HIV through sexual contact. Other modes of HIV transmission include sharing of unsterile needles, syringes, or cutting instruments (such as razor blades), and perinatal (woman to fetus) transmission.

Focus: Concerns about AIDS. Many secondary students are sexually active, and myths about AIDS, as well as facts, are circulated among students. Talking about sex and AIDS can be uncomfortable and difficult, but allowing your students to voice their concerns about AIDS and to reveal what they've heard about AIDS in a supportive atmosphere is the first step to increasing awareness and motivating students to change their sexual behavior. Understanding AIDS makes it less frightening. Understanding, furthermore, informs students that they are not powerless in fighting the disease.

Objectives: At the end of Lesson 2, students will be able to:

· Express concerns about AIDS.
· Define myth.
· State and debunk myths about AIDS.
· Demonstrate understanding of the vocabulary listed below.

Functions:

· Reporting Hearsay.
· Expressing Worry.

Structure:

· Adverbial Clauses of Time.

Vocabulary:

bed bug
bewitched
concerned
cursed
to date
to fall in love
to get (to be) pregnant
to go out
to lose weight
myth
to prevent
terrible
to transmit
well-informed
worried

Time: 3 Class Periods.

Understanding AIDS makes it less frightening.

EXERCISE 1: DOCTOR SAIDOU DIALOGUE

In this exercise, listen to your students and encourage them to express their concerns about AIDS. Don't preach, but do debunk myths about AIDS in a constructive manner Do not allow ridicule in the classroom.

If you have student workbooks, tell students to read the Doctor Saidou Dialogue. If you do not have student workbooks, write the following dialogue on the blackboard. Do NOT have students copy the dialogue. Read the dialogue twice. Explain the vocabulary highlighted in the dialogue.

Select seven students. Assign each student a role from the dialogue. Ask them to read the dialogue.

Dr. Saidou Dialogue

Teacher:

Dr. Saidou, we're very happy to have you here. Can you talk about this new disease we've heard about?

Dr. Saidou:

What's this new disease you've heard about?

Students:

AIDS! AIDS!

Dr. Saidou:

Oh! So you've heard about it, too.

Teacher:

We're worried about this disease, Dr. Saidou. Is it true that many people have it and it has killed others?

Dr. Saidou:

Yes, but we can prevent AIDS. So, students, tell me why you're worried about AIDS.

Student A:

Because it's a terrible disease that kills men and women, leaving children with no parents.

Student B:

This disease catches people in places like this. If any of us have this disease now, we're gone!

Student C:

You people don't understand that you get this disease if you're cursed or bewitched.

Student D:

You see, we have to look after our sick people but they give us this disease. What can we do?

Student E:

We've heard that bed bugs and dirty people transmit this disease.

Dr. Saidou:

Well, I see that you're very concerned about AIDS, and I will try to answer all your questions. We all need to be well-informed to prevent this disease.

Comprehension Questions: Use the following questions to check students' understanding of the dialogue. (5 minutes)

1. How do the students and the teacher feel about AIDS?

2. What have the students heard about AIDS?

Discussion Questions: Use the following questions to guide discussion of the dialogue with your students. (10 minutes)

1. Are you worried about AIDS?
2. Why are you worried about AIDS?
3. What have you heard about AIDS?

Do not respond yet to the answers of your students. Encourage students to talk. Listen closely to their concerns.

(NOTE: Unit 2 deals with myths in detail. For this exercise, quickly identify and debunk the specific myths in the dialogue. Do not spend much time right now in discussing myths because you will be doing this in later exercises.)

Write the word MYTH on the blackboard. Ask students to define MYTH. Make sure that your students understand that a myth is not based on fact.

Ask students to identify the myths in the dialogue. Debunk the myths (explain why they are false) with the following facts:

MYTH 1

"The disease catches people."

FACT

AIDS does not "catch" people. People transmit HIV mainly through unprotected sex.

MYTH 2

"....you get this disease if you're cursed or bewitched."

FACT

AIDS is caused by HIV which is spread mainly through unprotected sex.

MYTH 3

"...our sick people....give us this disease."

FACT

AIDS is spread from one person to another mainly through unprotected sex. It is not spread by living, touching, or eating with sick people.

MYTH 4

"....bed bugs and dirty people transmit this disease."

FACT

HIV is not transmitted by insects (bed bugs, cockroaches, mosquitoes) nor dirt. AIDS is spread mainly through unprotected sex. You cannot get HIV from a mosquito because the saliva kills the virus.

Tell students to write the four myths in their notebooks and give the facts to correct the myths.

Myth 1_____________________________
Fact_______________________________

Myth 2_____________________________
Fact_______________________________

Myth 3_____________________________
Fact_______________________________

Myth 4_____________________________
Fact_______________________________

EXERCISE 2: HABIBA'S SHORT LIFE

Write the following vocabulary on the blackboard. Give simple examples of these words in sentences. If your students do not understand, give simple definitions.

to go out (with someone)/to date
to get pregnant
to fall in love
to lose weight

Tell your students that you are going to read them a story. The story is about a young, Cameroonian woman, Habiba. It is a true story that happened five years ago. If you have student workbooks, do NOT allow students to read the story. Tell them only to listen to you as you read the story.

Draw the timeline shown below on the blackboard. As you read the story, point to relevant years on the timeline. You may want to read the text two or three times to make sure that your students have the opportunity to understand.

TIME LINE




Back to School




Second


Habiba

Aminou



Maboudi




Baby


Dies

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23


Yroumsia






Marriage

Habiba Sick



pregnant left school











HABIBA'S SHORT LIFE

Habiba had her first boyfriend when she was 12. His name was Aminou. They were together for 2 years. They had sex. When she was 14, Habiba began going out with another boy called Yroumsia. Soon after she started dating Yroumsia, she got pregnant. She left school because it is illegal for pregnant women to go to school. During her pregnancy, Habiba had some medical problems and went to see the traditional doctor in her village. Because she was complaining of pain in her lower back he cut her back with a razor blade. She felt better after that, and before she was 15, Habiba had her first baby.

Habiba resumed to school when she was 16. She fell in love with Maboudi and stayed with him until she finished school. When Habiba was 20, they got married. After they got married, Habiba had her second baby. When Habiba was 22, she got sick. She had diarrhea for several months and lost a lot of weight. She also had a persistent fever and coughed a lot. One year loser, Habiba died.

One day Mabouti's friend told him that Habiba probably died from AIDS. Since that day, Mabouti has been very worried.

Comprehension Questions: Tell your students to refer to the timeline on the blackboard to answer the following questions. If you have student workbooks, do not allow students to refer to the written text. This part of the exercise is oral.

1. When did Habiba first have sex?
2. Why did Habiba leave school?
3. Who is the father of Habiba's first baby?
4. How old was Habiba when she returned to school?
5. Who did Habiba fall in love with at school?
6. When did Habiba have Mabouti's baby?
7. How old was Habiba when she died?

ANSWER KEY:

1. Habiba first had sex at the age of 12.
2. Habiba left school because it is illegal for pregnant women to go to school
3. Yroumsia is the father of Habiba's first baby.
4. Habiba was 16 when she resumed to school.
5. Habiba fell in love with Mabouti at school.
6. Habiba had Mabouti's baby offer they were married.
7. Habiba was 23 years old when she died.

If you have student workbooks, tell students to see Habiba's Short Life. Tell students to read the story and write the answers to the comprehension questions which follow in their notebooks.

If you do not have student workbooks, write the story on the blackboard and tell students to copy it in their notebooks. Tell students that the new vocabulary is underlined.

Write the comprehension questions on the blackboard and ask students to write the questions and answers in their notebooks.

Discussion Questions: Discuss the answers to the following questions with your students.

1. Why is Mabouti worried?
2. What can Mabouti do now?

Adverbial Clauses of Time

Ask your students to tell you some adverbs of time. You may need to provide a couple examples such as after, before, etc. Write a list of these adverbs on the blackboard. Tell students to look at the text "Habiba's Short Life" and identify the time adverbs in the story (when, after, before, since).

Explain the following to your students: At the beginning of a sentence, an adverbial clause is always followed by a comma. The adverbs listed on the blackboard are time adverbs because they deal with an aspect of time.

Ask your students to find adverbial clauses of time in Habiba's story and copy them in their notebooks. Write the first example from the text on the blackboard underlining the clause. Point out the adverb when.

when she was 12

Explain to your students that an adverbial clause may occur at the beginning of a sentence. When an adverbial clause occurs at the beginning of a sentence, it must be followed by a comma. Illustrate this by writing the following sentence on the blackboard underneath the first sentence.

When she was 12, Habiba had her first boyfriend.

Ask students to write three sentences about a typical African secondary student using adverbial clauses of time. It is not necessary to write about sex.

ANSWER KEY: Adverbial Clauses of time are underlined.

HABIBA'S SHORT LIFE

Habiba had her first boyfriend when she was 12. His name was Aminou. They were together for 2 years. They had sex. When she was 14, Habiba began going out with another boy called Yroumsia. Soon after she started dating Yroumsia, she got pregnant. She left school because it is illegal for pregnant women to go to school. During her pregnancy, Habiba had some medical problems and went to see the traditional doctor in her village. Because she was complaining of pain in her lower back, he cut her back with a razor blade. She was fine after that, and before she was 15, Habiba had her first baby.

Habiba returned to school when she was 16. She fell in love with Maboudi and stayed with him until she finished school. When Habiba was 20, they got married. After they got married, Habiba had her second baby. When Habiba was 22, she got sick. She had diarrhea for several months and lost a lot of weight. She also had a persistent fever and coughed a lot. One year later, Habiba died.

One day Mabouti's friend told him that Habiba probably died from AIDS. Since that day, Mabouti has been very worried.