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close this bookGhana: A Baseline Study of the Teacher Education System (CIE, 2000, 67 p.)
close this folderChapter 1: Basic Education in Ghana: An Overview
View the document1.1 Introduction
View the document1.2 National Indicators
View the document1.3 Recent History of the Basic Education System
View the document1.4 Structure and Characteristics of Basic Education
View the document1.5 Participation in Basic Education
View the document1.6 Pupil-Teacher Ratios
View the document1.7 The Quality of Basic Education
View the document1.8 Education Expenditure
View the document1.9 Teachers
View the document1.10 Conclusion

1.6 Pupil-Teacher Ratios

Aggregate pupil-teacher ratios (PTRs) in Ghana are generous by international standards in developing countries, and in 1996 were 32 and 21 for primary and JSS, respectively. The PTR is a crucial indicator of how the costs of providing education services are being influenced. Projections from the 1998 MOE Education Sector Strategic Plan, indicate a clear government commitment to steadily increase PTRs in primary and JSS schools to 35.2 and 22.7 by 2003. See Table 1.6.

Table 1.6: Projected Pupil-Teacher Ratios at Primary and JSS Levels, 1998-2003


1998/99

1999/00

2000/01

2001/02

2002/03

2003/04

primary

33.7

33.9

34.3

34.6

34.9

35.2

JSS

21.2

21.5

21.8

22.1

22.4

22.7

Source: Education Sector Strategic Plan 1998-2003, MOE, 1998

National PTRs, however, hide large disparities in class sizes, with some urban primary schools having classes as large as 80 children, while many rural schools have classes of less than 20. Average regional PTRs provide some indication of variation by geographical location (Table 1.7).

Table 1.7: Average Regional Primary Pupil-Teacher Ratios, 1997

Region

Average PTRs

Ashanti

31.3

Brong Ahafo

26.4

Central

36.1

Eastern

28.5

Greater Accra

40.0

Northern

37.2

Volta

32.1

Upper East

46.5

Upper West

39.7

Western

33.0

National Regional Average

33.4

Source: DFID 1998