Peter Hazell

Abstract

Full text Plenary  (47 Kb)


Institution: International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

E-mail: p.hazell@cgiar.org

Title: "The impact of agricultural research and the poor: A review of the state of knowledge." Co-authors: John Kerr, Shashi Kolavalli.

Biosummary: pending

Theme: Key 3

Abstract:

This paper will provide a conceptual framework showing how agricultural research can impact on the poor at different scales (intra-household, household, regional, national, and internationa) and provide an updated assessment of the vast empirical literature that now exists on how improved technologies (both CG and non-CG) have impacted on the poor. The paper will seek to identify under what conditions agricultural research is more or less pro-poor, and the kinds of research and policies that can facilitate more favorable outcomes for the poor. The role of participatory research methods in enhancing pro-poor outcomes will also be examined. The paper will seek to identify knowledge gaps in our empirical understanding of these relationships, and to set priorities for future research on this topic.


Peter Hazell

 

Institution: International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

E-mail: p.hazell@cgiar.org

Biosummary: pending

Title: "Public investment, agricultural growth, and poverty alleviation in rural India." Co-author: Shenggen Fan.

Theme: 1C

Abstract:

Rural poverty has fallen sharply in India in recent decades. This paper analyses the factors that have contributed to this downturn, and seeks to unravel the roles of agricultural growth and public investments in rural infrastructure, human capital and agricultural research. Based on an econometric analysis of pooled time series (1970 - 1994) and agro-ecological zone data, the paper analyses the direct and indirect impacts of public investments on agricultural growth and poverty alleviation. The paper also compares the marginal returns for growth and poverty alleviation from additional investments in different types of public investments, and between different types of agro-ecological zones. It is found that additional investments in roads have the largest impact on growth and poverty alleviation, while agricultural research ranks second. Moreover, the returns to all types of investments are higher in many rainfed areas than in irrigated areas, and they have larger poverty impacts. This also holds for some of the poorest rainfed areas.

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