close this bookTidBITS#414   19980126
View the documentMailBITS/26-Jan-98
View the documentMac OS 8.1 Delivers Under the Hood
View the documentAll About Macintosh Extended Format (HFS Plus)
View the documentFoot Notes

MailBITS/26-Jan-98

Free Netscape -- In a move aimed at stemming the gains Microsoft Internet Explorer has made in the Web browser market, Netscape Communications announced last week that it is making Netscape Navigator and Netscape Communicator Standard Edition free (Netscape Communicator Professional Edition costs $29). In a related announcement, Netscape launched an "Unlimited Distribution" program that allows computer makers, ISPs, content providers, publishers, and others to download and redistribute Netscape Navigator and Communicator for free. Finally, Netscape said it would make the source code to the next version of Netscape Communicator available for free on the Internet for modification and redistribution. These are bold moves but may be necessary for a company that industry juggernaut Microsoft has targeted as direct competition. [ACE]

<http://www.netscape.com/communicator/free_faq.html>
<http://www.netscape.com/newsref/pr/newsrelease560.html>
<http://www.netscape.com/newsref/pr/newsrelease558.html>

No Eudora Pro 4.0 for Macintosh Overseas -- Qualcomm has confirmed that Eudora Pro 4.0 for Macintosh may never be made available outside of North America. The problem is that in those markets, Qualcomm is signing up local "re-publishers" who will be responsible for localization, sales, marketing, and distribution. To date, none have been willing to expend effort and resources on the Macintosh version, citing insufficient demand to justify the cost despite the fact that international sales account for 50 percent of Apple's sales. Exacerbating the problem is the fact that Qualcomm's PGP license requires that it be bundled with every copy of the domestic Eudora Pro; since PGP contains strong encryption, it cannot be exported internationally. Reportedly, once all the re-publishers sign up, Qualcomm will post contact information for them so Mac users can petition those companies for support. Eudora Pro 3.1 (see our review of Eudora Pro 3.0 in TidBITS-357) remains available internationally. [ACE]

<http://www.eudora.com/international/>
<http://db.tidbits.com/getbits.acgi?tbart=00800>

Open Transport 1.3 -- Mac OS 8.1 includes Open Transport 1.3, an update to Apple's networking software. OT 1.3 offers general performance improvements, better recognition of serial ports - particularly in conjunction with PC Card modems - and numerous tweaks and bug fixes. What's new and exciting about OT 1.3 is single-link multihoming, which enables a Mac's Ethernet hardware to respond to more than one IP address simultaneously (for example, a server can more easily serve multiple Web sites, each having its own domain name). Previously, this functionality was only available on Macs via MkLinux, WebTen, or other Unix-like products. Although users who use modems to access the Internet won't much care about single-link multihoming, it can be critically important to Internet service providers who host Internet servers on Macs.

Administrators configure single-link multihoming via a text file called IP Secondary Addresses stored in the Preferences folder - the exact format is included in OT 1.3's Technical Info document. However, just because OT supports multiple IP addresses doesn't mean Internet applications do, and most Internet server applications must be revised to offer direct support. (QuidProQuo 2.1 and the public beta of WebSTAR 3.0 already do.) Although single-link multihoming is a new and welcome capability, it doesn't put alternatives like HomeDoor and ClearlyHome out of business; OT 1.3 assumes administrators have IP addresses to spare and lacks some of the special features of these add-on products. [GD]

<http://www.starnine.com/webstar/webstar.html>
<http://www.socialeng.com/>
<http://www.opendoor.com/homedoor/>
<http://www.clearink.com/fun_stuff/plugins/clearlyhome/>