close this bookTidBITS#291   19950821
View the documentMailBITS/21-Aug-95
View the documentMacworld Superlatives
View the documentAOL FTP Additions
View the documentOntological Breakdown, or, Pretending to be a Help System
View the documentReviews/21-Aug-95
View the documentFoot Notes

MailBITS/21-Aug-95

Mick's The Man -- I guess Bill Gates decided that the Rolling Stones song "Start Me Up" would be perfect for advertising Windows 95, since one of Windows 95's most recognizable features is a Start button on the Task Bar. According to the Sun, an English tabloid, Microsoft contacted Mick Jagger about it, and Mick asked for a whopping $12 million for rights to use the song in Windows 95 advertising. Apparently, Mick thought that if he asked for a preposterously large amount, that Microsoft would go home empty-handed, but Microsoft's response was "Do you want cash, or is a check all right?" So, starting this week, expect to hear the Stones' best three chords used for peddling software. Of course, Macintosh aficionados can get some mileage out of the song's chorus - "You make a grown man cry" - but I'll leave that as an exercise for the reader. [GD]

QuickDraw 3D Available from Apple -- Apple recently announced that QuickDraw 3D 1.0 - its new 3D rendering and realization software - is available online, as well as with the new Power Mac 8500 and 7500 computers and commercial rendering packages (such as Strata's StudioPro Blitz). QuickDraw 3D requires a Power Mac with at least 16 MB of RAM and the package weighs in at about 2.4 MB. Apple also has sample applications and models available online, along with information for developers and other interested parties. If you have a Power Mac, RAM, and CPU cycles to spare, check it out! [GD]

http://www.austin.apple.com/qd3d/

Where Do You Want To Go Today? As the computing world braces for a Windows 95 onslaught, Apple comes out swinging with a no-holds-barred campaign reminding potential buyers of the still-significant Macintosh advantage. The campaign uses radio, TV, print advertising, and a dedicated Web site. In the campaign, Apple pokes fun at some of Windows 95's advances: "It lets you use more than eight characters to name your files. It has a trash can you can open and take things back out again. It lets you drop files anywhere you want on the desktop. Imagine that. Windows 95 makes a PC more like a Macintosh - you know, the Macintosh we built back in 1984." No timidity here. [MHA]

[Still, one wonders what Apple hopes to accomplish against Microsoft's marketing juggernaut - is Apple reassuring investors and current users, or do they hope to attract new customers? Microsoft will reportedly spend $500 million this year promoting Windows 95. For $500 million, Bill could make almost three Kevin Costner movies. That's a lot of money. -Geoff]

http://www2.apple.com/whymac/

Power Mac Office 4.2x Update Update -- In TidBITS-289, I reported on questions and quirks relating to the Office 4.2x Update for Power Mac. In the article, I said that Office 4.2x Update for Power Mac, version n/a, has been updated to version 1.01. A few people wrote in asking about Office 4.2x Update for Power Mac 1.0, which may be installed from the Office CD. My contacts at Microsoft have confirmed that version 1.0 is the same as version n/a, so if you have version 1.0 and use either the Global Village Toolbox extension or STF Technologies's FAXstf software, you should replace version 1.0 with version 1.01.

Microsoft has posted the Office 4.2x Update for Power Mac incorrectly, such that you must download it in binary mode. Try downloading the cryptically named file from the URL below using Netscape (which downloads most everything in binary mode), or try using Fetch, which has a Binary button that can force a binary download. Otherwise, configure your FTP client to treat the file suffix ".hqx" as a binary file, and be sure to change the setting back when you're done. [TJE]

ftp://ftp.microsoft.com/Softlib/MSLFILES/MC1164.HQX

Jason Whong <whong@ithaca.edu> writes:

It appears the folks at Ziff-Davis publishing are surveying computer users about their willingness to upgrade to Windows 95. This survey is accessible on the Web at the Ziff-Davis site. In jest, I took the survey, but I was surprised to discover that they seem to expect Macintosh users to respond. So, through the survey, it was duly noted that I'm comfortable with my iteration of System 7, and that I'm not interested in upgrading to an OS that won't run on my computer. [These surveys are never statistically valid because of the way the data are collected, so hey, stop in and let Ziff-Davis know what you as a Mac user think of Windows 95. -Adam]

http://www.zdnet.com/~zdi/win95/win95.html