close this bookTidBITS#302   19951106
View the documentMailBITS/06-Nov-95
View the documentPageMill Ships
View the documentSave Time with NotifyMail
View the documentCreate Your Own Home Page
View the documentAn Army of One - Japan's PowerBook Guru
View the documentKeep on Moving
View the documentReviews/06-Nov-95
View the documentFoot Notes

MailBITS/06-Nov-95

Dataquest Says Apple Gained Market Share -- According to preliminary figures from Dataquest, Apple's market share rose from 7.4 percent in the second calendar quarter of 1995 to 9.0 percent for the third calendar quarter of 1995. Dataquest cited healthy sales to consumer and education markets, noting that sales of Macintosh Performas have doubled in the last year - and we aren't even into the holiday buying season yet. Unit shipments during the third calendar quarter of 1995 were up more than 26 percent. All in all, this is good news for Apple, combined with earnings of $3 billion during its fourth fiscal quarter, shipments of 1.25 million machines, a study from QED Research showing Apple's share of the U.S. K-12 education market rose to 63 percent, and an IDC study showing Apple still has the largest installed base in U.S. homes. You'd almost forget it was the same quarter Microsoft released its "Mac killer" Windows 95. [GD]

Apple Reorgs Marketing; Eilers to Leave -- Apple announced last week the company plans to move responsibility for sales, marketing, and customer solutions strategies from the Worldwide Marketing and Customer Solutions division down to three existing geographically-based groups handling Europe, Japan and Asia, and the Americas. Apple bills this change as the latest step in their market segmentation strategy, to which they credit recent reports of increased market share. As a result of these changes, Dan Eilers - former CEO of Claris and long-time Apple executive - has announced he will be leaving the company after a transition period. It's interesting to note that these changes fall only seven months after Apple made sweeping organizational shifts to form Eilers' Worldwide Marketing and Customer Solutions division in the first place. [GD]

Novell to Sell WordPerfect -- Sixteen months after spending over a billion dollars to get into the desktop applications market with WordPerfect and Quattro Pro, Novell Inc. announced last week that its word-processing and spreadsheet product lines are for sale. The move got a positive reaction from Wall Street and investors - who'd much rather see Novell concentrate on networking products than diverting effort to competing with Microsoft's Office application suite - but drew sharp criticism from users, since the future of these applications is now foggier than ever. Though Novell declined to give names, it said that there are at least two serious bidders for the products, one of which is rumored to be Ray Noorda (former CEO of Novell and the architect of Novell's original purchase of the applications), who now controls commercial rights to Linux, a popular shareware version of Unix. [GD]

Got a Twitch You Just Can't Scratch? Do you ever feel paranoid, like there might be aliens and monsters lurking around every corner? Or are you just looking for some target practice? Either way, you're in luck: a shareware version of the unbearably popular DOOM I has been released for the Macintosh by id Software, Inc. Though you need a 68040-based Mac or better to play it, this version comes fully-featured, handles multi-player games, and is generally guaranteed to aggravate any hand or wrist problems you might have.

"But wait," you're saying, "why play a game that started on the PC when there's Marathon, an appropriately blood-soaked, shoot-em-up game born on the Macintosh?" Well, you're in luck too: a demo of Marathon 2 is available online as well. These games are massive - DOOM I is about 3 MB, and the demo of Marathon 2 is a whopping 15 MB - so be prepared to spend some time downloading them. Also check the ReadMe files for system requirements and instructions. Before you ask, no, DOOM II is only available commercially. [GD]

ftp://mirror.aol.com/pub/info-mac/game/arc/doom-i-101.hqx
ftp://mirror.aol.com/pub/info-mac/game/com/mthn/marathon2-demo.hqx

Peter Glaskowsky <png@idt.com> writes:
One day at the recent Microprocessor Forum, I sat next to Rick Doherty, who is Steve Wozniak's business partner at Envisioneering. I didn't know who he was at first, but I was struck by the remarkable variety of consumer electronic devices he was carting around. One item particularly attracted my attention, and I asked him about it. It was a Ricoh digital camera, currently only on sale in Japan, and I didn't catch the model name/number. It's about the size of one of an old Instamatic camera for 110 film, and is used in that orientation. It takes 720 x 512 images, and records them to a small internal Flash-memory card (like a PC Card, but smaller).

Now, get this - it can also capture motion video. It has an internal motion JPEG hardware codec, and can record up to six seconds of video per 8 MB of Flash. It has a detachable video interface with RCA plugs for connection to a VCR (I didn't catch whether it has a video input, but it definitely has a video output). I don't know if it supports NTSC.

The downside is that the unit is about $1,300 in Japan. Doherty said he's been told that Ricoh is thinking about making it available in the USA, but that they believe they could sell them for even more money, up to $2,500 or so. Apart from the price, it looked like an extremely neat product.