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View the documentMailBITS/07-Jun-93
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View the documentApple Volume Software Licenses
View the documentCable Conundrums
View the documentSmoothie With A Capital SMOO
View the documentReviews/07-Jun-93
View the documentFoot Notes

MailBITS/07-Jun-93

Sigh. It turns out that the Post Office added another ZIP code to our area shortly before we moved. Of course, no one told us about this, and we didn't notice right away. If you have our address in a database, the correct ZIP code is 98056. Sorry for the trouble.

Retrospect A/UX, which is almost identical to Retrospect 2.0 but includes full support for both Unix and Macintosh file systems, was announced recently by Dantz Development. Retrospect A/UX requires Apple's A/UX 3.0.1 and should be available in early June.

Dantz Development -- 510/849-0293 -- 510/849-1708 (fax) -- DANTZ@applelink.apple.com

The highlight of the annual Computer Bowl occurred when Bill Gates, who was a judge, posed the following question to the contestants:

"What contest, held via Usenet, is dedicated to examples of weird, obscure, bizarre, and really bad programming?"

After a moment of silence, Jean-Louis Gassee (ex-honcho at Apple) hit his buzzer and answered "Windows."

Mr. Bill's expression was, in the words of one who was there, "classic."

Modem Follies -- A number of people wrote in about Mark Anbinder's article in TidBITS #176 concerning a strange line noise problem. It seems that this problem was big news in Australia some time back, as Ian MacColl <macoll@qut.edu.au> reported, and some of the theories there included some phones drawing too much power from the line, a capacitor charging to maintain stored numbers, or the affected phones reporting to their superiors at Telecom Australia Headquarters (a popular choice, since the problem was cyclical).

Ed Segall <edward.segall@n3.sp.cs.cmu.edu> proposed an alternate theory based on a problem he had and solved. Apparently, if the phone creates Radio Frequency Interference (RFI), the RFI can wreak havoc on modem connections. Ed said the simplest solution (short of buying a new phone) is a $20 AT&T Radio Frequency filter.

John Harkin <jh@nbn.com> had the best sounding theory, suggesting that the problem is caused by "the nonlinearities of the input impedances caused by cheap transformers." I don't know what it means, but I like the sound of it.

MacIntercomm and MacIntercomm Lite, originally developed by Mercury Computing, have been acquired by New World Computing (NWC). MacIntercomm is best known for its ability to transfer files at full speed in the background no matter what the foreground process.

NWC -- 818/999-0607 -- help@inter.com -- intercomm@aol.com

QuickTime 1.6 bugs are popping up all over. Jon Pugh <jpugh@apple.com> reported on Info-Mac that he isolated a conflict between QuickTime 1.6 and Now Toolbox 4.0.1p that caused problems when resolving an alias that mounts a network volume. In addition, two companies that I beta test for have mentioned that QuickTime 1.6 conflicts with the latest betas of their software (and no, I'm not going to say who since it's not shipping software). Beware.