close this bookTidBITS#218   19940321
View the documentMailBITS/21-Mar-94
View the documentAdobe + Aldus = Adobus?
View the documentWhat, More Money?
View the documentJust Some General Magic
View the documentAn Article for Morons
View the documentThe "FatNewt": The MessagePad Scribbles On!
View the documentReviews/21-Mar-94
View the documentFoot Notes

MailBITS/21-Mar-94

The late-breaking news that we've had no time to digest is that today Novell purchased WordPerfect for a whopping $1.4 billion in stock, creating one of the world's largest software companies. Wow.

In the wake of the Power Macintosh introduction, a friend at Apple wrote to tell us that the company had a Friday beer bash, the first in many weeks, and that the bash was sponsored by IBM and Motorola. Who would have imagined that one day IBM would sponsor Apple parties?

Apologies to Graphisoft Software and Graphsoft, Inc., the publishers of ArchiCAD and MiniCAD, respectively. In our "Power Macintosh Nativeware" article in TidBITS #217 we incorrectly listed both products as being from Graphisoft. Mark pleads our readers' and the companies' forgiveness; he was reading from a blurry photocopy of a fax while compiling his list! Thanks to an attentive Vittorio Dell'Aiuto <mc3520@mclink.it> for living up to his name (which means "help" in Italian) and helping us out!

John Baxter <jwbaxter@olympus.net> writes:

I've been running my Power Macintosh 8100/80 since setting it up Thursday. My general impression is that everything is fast, but since I'm comparing the new machine with my unaccelerated Macintosh IIci, that's not surprising. What is surprising is that Eudora grabs mail much faster over my 14,400 bps modem connection using MacPPP. I had assumed that the modem connection was the bottleneck, and it probably is now.

I've found only one conflict so far on the Power Macintosh. I back up using Retrospect 2.0Bi (which came bundled with my DAT drive). Retrospect freezes several minutes into a backup run if Virtual Memory is active. I have destroyed two storage sets that way, although I've since rebuilt them. Retrospect seems perfectly happy with Virtual Memory turned off, whether or not the Power Mac's Modern Memory Manager is turned on. [We weren't able to discuss this with Dantz before deadline but felt that it was worth warning people to prevent backup problems during this week. We hope to have more next issue. Also note that Dantz is working on a PowerPC-native version of Retrospect that will undoubtedly fix any such problems. -Adam]

Dave Peltier <peltierd@lawrence.edu> wrote to tell us that the AudioVision adapter cable, necessary to connect a standard Mac monitor cable to a Power Mac's HDI-45 video port, is not included with every Power Mac as we stated in TidBITS #217. Some checking has revealed that the adapter is included with the Power Macintosh 6100, since that machine has only the single HDI-45 AudioVision video port. The 7100 and 8100 models' bundled video card offers a standard DB-15 video port, so the adapter is unnecessary for most users.

Erik Speckman <especkma@romulus.reed.edu> writes:

In TidBITS #217 Mark Anbinder asserts that, instead of advancing the PowerPC architecture, the MPC 603 brings the PowerPC to low cost and low power applications.

This is only half right. The 603 advances the architecture by implementing separate instruction and data caches. It also implements a separate load/store unit, so that memory operations can execute in parallel with integer, floating point, and branch instructions. The 603 may not be the fastest member of the family but I think it looks more like the future of PowerPC than the 601 does.

Don Pickens <ms.word.mktg@applelink.apple.com>, Product Manager for Word for the Macintosh, writes:

In reply to TidBITS #217 on the Power Macintosh launch and Microsoft's participation:

At the Power Macintosh launch on March 14, Microsoft showed a very powerful demonstration of a solution built in AppleScript using support of AppleScript in the new versions of Word, Microsoft Excel and FoxPro. Clearly, this is a Mac-specific capability. The applications being demonstrated were in fact running on the Power Macintosh and Macintosh, and hence should remove doubt from customers' minds about the progress we're making toward shipping these applications this summer. And although we weren't able to ship by March 14, this is because rather than just porting our current applications to Power Macintosh, Microsoft is developing a whole new generation of applications for both the Mac and Power Mac. Our plans to ship new versions the five products we announced (Microsoft Excel, Word, FoxPro, Works and Office) actually demonstrates a stronger level of long term commitment. And, the minimal demo time we had didn't allow us to restate or show our already announced support for PowerTalk, QuickDraw GX and other Apple technologies. Although most of the features demonstrated are available in the Windows versions of our products, compatibility across platforms without requiring file conversions has become a prerequisite not only to the majority of our customers who share files with users of other platforms, but also to over two-thirds of Apple's top customers, as cited in MacWEEK in a January 1994 survey.

Jamie McCarthy <k044477@hobbes.kzoo.edu> writes:

I just ordered a pair of the Yamaha YST-M10 speakers that Craig O'Donnell mentioned in TidBITS #216. The YST series is Yamaha's part number for its cables; the first two dealers I talked to were puzzled by that. When I mentioned that I'd read about it in a computer magazine, they guessed correctly that the YST-M10 is a special model for computers that comes with the right cable. Dealers without the latest catalogs from Yamaha might not know this.

More interestingly, I found the speakers advertised in CDW's catalog (part number CDW 33070) for $89, but they'd lowered the price to $69 plus shipping, which is $30 lower than the next-lowest advertised price that I found.

CDW -- 800/906-4CDW

Kyle <kylea63834@aol.com> writes to tell us that MEI/Micro Center now sells refill kits for HP DeskWriter printer cartridges. It seems that they have figured out how to refill both the original DeskWriter cartridges and the new high-capacity ones, which were previously thought to be good for only one use. I'd recommend calling and checking to make sure you get the right kit for your printer (or you can just ask for a catalog). The kits cost $11.99 each, or $10.99 for two or more, with $0.50 shipping for each one. MEI/Micro Center notes: "APO's, FPO's, and Canada add $4.00 additional for shipping. Orders shipped to AK, HI, VI, GU and PR, please call Customer Service (toll-free 800/634-3478). We cannot ship orders outside of the U.S. and Canada." Apologies to our overseas readers.

MEI/Micro Center -- 800/634-3478 -- 614/486-6417 (fax)