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MailBITS/22-Jul-96

Small Apple Loss Better Than Expected -- Last week, Apple released financial results for its third quarter of 1996, recording a loss of $32 million. Though $32 million is a lot of money, it's important to note that Wall Street was expecting Apple to post a loss three to ten times larger than that, although Apple fudged its balance sheet a bit through a one-time sale of holdings in America Online and another one-time tax benefit. Nonetheless, the numbers caused many brokerage firms to upgrade their ratings of Apple stock, and confidence in Apple's new management seems to be growing, though Apple is careful to point out it doesn't expect to return to profitability until the second quarter of 1997. Nonetheless, it appears BusinessWeek's recent pronouncements of Apple's death may have been slightly exaggerated (see TidBITS-312). [GD]

<http://product.info.apple.com/pr/press.releases/1996/q4/960717.pr.rel.q396.html>

Power Computing Announces High-End 604e-based Macs -- Power Computing has announced its new PowerTower Pro line, the first computers to feature the PowerPC 604e processor. The PowerTower Pros are aimed squarely at the high end of the Mac market, with six PCI slots, nine expansion bays, eight interleaved DIMM slots, and blazing clock speeds of 180, 200, and 225 MHz. The machines also feature 1 MB of Level 2 cache, an 8x CD-ROM drive, 16 to 32 MB of RAM, an IMS Twin Turbo 128-bit video card with 8 MB of VRAM, and a 10 MB per second internal Fast SCSI bus. With prices ranging from $4,200 for a basic PowerTower Pro 180 to $6,300 for a fully-loaded PowerTower Pro 225 with an AV card and built-in Iomega Jaz drive, these machine aren't for users on a budget, but could be perfect for people who live for disk- and processor-intensive tasks such as animation, video editing, scientific visualization, and engineering.

Power Computing also announced that CPU upgrade cards based on the PowerPC 604 and 604e will be available in September for owners of existing PowerTower, PowerCenter, PowerWave, and PowerCurve systems, with speeds ranging from 132 to 200 MHz. To qualify for ordering a processor upgrade card, you must call Power Computing and provide your machine's serial number. Prices range from $400 to $1,200. [GD]

Power Computing -- 512/388-6868 -- 800/999-7279 --
<info@powercc.com>

<http://www.powercc.com/>

Speed Doubler 1.3 -- Connectix has released Speed Doubler 1.3, a maintenance release containing fixes for Speed Emulator and (particularly) Speed Copy. Speed Copy now has improved overall performance, better response over slow connections (like ARA), compatibility with Asante's NetDoubler, and fixes for a number of other interface problems and bugs (such as a crash involving copying with an open control panel). Connectix recommends all Speed Doubler owners upgrade to version 1.3; updaters are available online for free, or registered users can receive the updater on a floppy for $10. [GD]

Connectix -- 415/571-5195 -- 800/950-5880

<http://www.connectix.com/connect/files/SD13U.sea.hqx>
<ftp://ftp.connectix.com/pub/SpeedDoubler/SD13U.sea.hqx>

HyperCard 2.3.5 Updater -- Apple has finally released an updater to version 2.3.5 of HyperCard, catching up with the previous releases of version 2.3.5 of some HyperCard stacks and the HyperCard Player. The update to HyperCard itself fixes cosmetic and performance problems, and a long-standing bug with saving some colorized stand-alone stacks. Two updaters are available: one just for HyperCard, and one for HyperCard and the updated stacks. The updated stacks and the HyperCard Player are also available separately; the following URL points to the directory where all these items can be found. [GD]

<ftp://ftp.support.apple.com/pub/apple_sw_updates/US/mac/utils/>