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View the documentMailBITS/20-Jun-94
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View the documentGIFConverter 2.3.7
View the documentEl-Fish, The Electronic Aquarium
View the documentReviews/20-Jun-94
View the documentFoot Notes

MailBITS/20-Jun-94

According to MacWEEK, Apple's eWorld online service is here, opening its doors today to thousands of people. TidBITS should appear on eWorld officially at some point, but despite some external efforts, Apple Online Services still has yet to send us a contract. In the meantime, you can access TidBITS through the eWorld Internet gateway, but beware that the gateway splits incoming Internet messages into 7K chunks (for compatibility with NewtonMail). The basic subscription rate for eWorld is $8.95 per month, which includes two free hours of evening or weekend use. Additional hours during evenings and weekends cost $4.95 and day time access (6 AM to 6 PM local time) costs $1.90 per hour. You can call eWorld at 9,600 bps, but you need the eWorld software, which is available free from Apple at 800/775-4556. I suppose it's too much to ask for an email address for requesting the software. [ACE]

PowerPC Native -- We received two corrections to the list of PowerPC native applications in TidBITS-230. First, Hard Disk Toolkit 1.5.1 runs only in emulation mode on Power Macs, but FWB is working on a native version. Second, although it wasn't in that list, TCP/Connect II 1.2.1 from InterCon Systems runs in native mode on the Power Macs. [TJE]

FWB -- <fwb@applelink.apple.com>
InterCon Systems -- <sales@intercon.com>

Randy Gresham <rgresham@cclink.fhcrc.org> passed on a URL for a Web server that provides stock quotes. You must know the ticker symbol (AAPL for Apple), and quotes are delayed somewhere between 15 and 60 minutes. Various graphical representations of the Dow Jones Industrial Average are available, although none of this information is guaranteed or meant to be used in a commercial situation (and the service will be shut down if it's abused). Kudos to Security APL and Data Transmission Network for providing this free service to Internet users. The basic idea is to use the quote service as a form of advertising for the fee-based services that these companies also offer. Frankly, I think it's a good idea and wish them the best of luck with it. The quote server is forms-based, so Mac users must use either MacWeb or NCSA Mosaic 2.0a. [ACE]

http://www.secapl.com/cgi-bin/qs

A new PC emulator from a small Arizona company called Utilities Unlimited International can supposedly run PC software on a Power Mac at Pentium speeds. The company claims that the still-unnamed emulator requires only 1 MB of RAM to run and will provide full 486 emulation, which is slated to appear in Insignia's SoftWindows later this year. If that's not enough, the emulator will supposedly run DOS, Windows, Unix, OS/2, and Windows NT. This may sound like something we'd include in an April Fools issue, but apparently Utilities Unlimited is best known for their Amiga-based Emplant emulators, and Amiga users on the nets, while skeptical, have said that if anyone can do it, Utilities Unlimited can. The emulator is written entirely in assembly for speed, and is slated to ship for about $150 in late summer (Northern Hemisphere). There's not much point in arguing about whether or not what they claim is possible, since they've set themselves a difficult task, and it will be relatively easy to tell when the program ships, if it ships, whether or not it lives up to its promises. [ACE]

MacUser arrives on the Internet in the form of an email address for sending letters to the editor. The address <letters@macuser.ziff.com> now accepts comments about MacUser or the state of the Mac for consideration for publication. However, the MacUser folks ask that you don't send requests for specific buying advice, requests for information in back issues, or requests for subscription information. The MacUser editors don't have time to handle requests of the first two types, and the subscription department isn't currently reachable via email.

If you submit a letter, please include your name and a daytime phone number. Also indicate if it's acceptable for MacUser to include your email address if your letter is printed. All letters become the property of MacUser, and MacUser reserves the right to edit any letters they print.

Although responses aren't guaranteed, the person who will read all the messages and may reply to some is Jason Snell, an assistant editor at MacUser and editor of the Internet fiction magazine InterText. In other words, Jason isn't an Internet neophyte, and I'm glad MacUser gave the job to someone who understands the Internet. [ACE]