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View the documentFoot Notes

MailBITS/27-Jun-94

If you regularly visit our FTP site at <ftp.tidbits.com> for Macintosh Internet software, be aware that we're moving files and directories around. Things may be rather difficult to find for the next week or so. I'll write more about the reorganization once it's complete. [ACE]

eWorld Rate Correction -- OK, so I blew the eWorld rates last issue. Here's the scoop, straight from the horse's press release. "The basic monthly subscription to the service is $8.95, which includes two free hours of evening or weekend usage. Each subsequent hour of usage is $4.95. In the U.S. and Canada only, there is an hourly surcharge of $2.95 during business hours (6 a.m. to 6 p.m. local time). Access from outside the U.S. carries a $7.95 per hour surcharge (24 hours per day), but no business hour surcharge. There is no extra charge for the use of the Internet mail gateway or for 9,600 bps access." [ACE]

Scott Storkel <sstorkel@netcom.com> writes:

Whoops! As several people have already pointed out, my comments about ETO pricing in TidBITS-231 weren't complete. ETO is $1,295 per year for the first year and $395 for each additional year rather than $1,295 every year as my comments implied.

Phil Ryan <ryanpf@ssmd.mrl.dsto.gov.au> writes in regard to the new PC emulator for the Power Macs that we mentioned in TidBITS-231:

I have had some experience with Utilities Unlimited and their product Emplant, a Mac emulator for the Amiga. Emplant has been in "developmental release" for quite a while. Utilities Unlimited (mainly in the person of Jim Drew, the chief programmer/engineer/president) does support its product strongly via the Internet and the various appropriate newsgroups.

Despite starting from behind in the Mac emulation game (behind Redisoft's Amax Mac emulator) Emplant is clearly the better product, having come out with a Mac-II class machine when Amax was really a souped-up Mac Plus-class machine. Emplant works, in colour, with System 7. It allows active switching between the Amiga and the Mac environments and supports various Amiga screen resolutions as well as standard Mac resolutions. It follows fairly well the CPU power of the particular Amiga that it is on (so a 33 MHz 68040 Amiga performs almost as fast as a 33 MHz 68040 Mac), while maintaining the multitasking of the Amiga.

However, Emplant was not supposed to be just a Mac emulator. It was supposed to be a multi-operating system emulator providing for easy addition of various modules for emulating other operating systems, including DOS/Windows.

I would not be at all surprised if the PC emulator for the Power Mac would be a very good product, be very cheap, and require less of your Power Mac than SoftWindows. I would be surprised if the first release was bug-free, but, like the Mac emulator for the PC (Executor by ARDI) would probably settle down after a while.

Ric Ford <ric_ford@macweek.ziff.com> writes:

It seemed odd to mention MacUser in TidBITS-231 and ignore MacWEEK, when MacWEEK has had Internet email addresses for a long time. You can send email to MacWEEK via the Internet for letters at <letters@macweek.ziff.com>, for Mac the Knife at <mac_the_knife@macweek.ziff.com> and for individual staff members at <any_staff_members_name@macweek.ziff.com>, such as my address, <mark_hall@macweek.ziff.com>, and <henry_norr@macweek.ziff.com>.

[No slight to MacWEEK was intended of course - we were simply responding to the announcement of the MacUser address. To be fair, then, if other Macintosh or Internet publications (since those are our main topics) wish to send us Internet addresses where readers can reach them, we'll be happy to compose a list for a future issue. -Adam]

Aldus ChartMaker may not print, but that doesn't make it an applet. Jason Stephenson <jjstep00@ukcc.uky.edu> wrote in response to the TidBITS-230 mention of ChartMaker: "How can anyone call a program that requires 8 MB of hard disk space and wants 4 MB of RAM an 'applet?' Everyone complains about Word's disk requirements but it is less bloated than this thing from Aldus. ChartMaker may provide plenty of functionality in making charts but is not what I consider an applet."

I had assumed that the full 8 MB disk requirement included a small application and various extras (online help, templates, fonts, clip art, and so on). Word requires more hard disk space to install than it actually takes up, and I had assumed that ChartMaker installs similarly. I called Aldus to find out if ChartMaker consumes 8 MB of disk space for the typical user, and found that if you tweak it a bit you can knock it down to 5 MB. I also found that unless you have an installation problem, you must pay $2 per minute for ChartMaker support. Ouch. Overall, I'm not impressed. If we are going to have small, integrated applications, they'd better start out smaller than ChartMaker, and such a goal isn't unrealistic. [TJE]