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close this bookEU-ACP Negotiations on Post Lomé IV Convention - The Stand of Uganda Civil Society (DENIVA, 1999, 55 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentForeword
View the documentPreface and Acknowledgements
View the documentCHAPTER 1 - The Lomé Convention - An Introduction
View the documentCHAPTER 2 - Lomé Convention Provisions and areas of Co-operation
View the documentCHAPTER 3 - The European Union: Structure and History
View the documentCHAPTER 4 - The Lomé IV Convention mid-term review - The main innovations
View the documentCHAPTER 5 - Relations between the EU and ACP Countries - A Review of the Green Paper
View the documentCHAPTER 6 - Involvement of the Civil Society Organisations
View the documentCHAPTER 7 - Conclusion and Recommendations
View the documentBibliography
View the documentImportant Contacts
View the documentAbbreviations and Acronyms

CHAPTER 1 - The Lomé Convention - An Introduction

Although the African Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) group came into being only at the time of the first Lomé Convention in 1975, co-operation between the European Community (now the Union) and countries with which they had special relations in Sub-Saharan Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific dates back to 1957. This was when the Treaty establishing the European Economic Community was concluded.

Below is a chart of the evolution.

Number of Countries

Year

Event

ACP

Europe

1957

European Economic Community (EEC)




Treaty Provision made under the treaty for association of non-European countries and territories with which EEC states had special relations



1963

Yaounde I Convention AASM(Associated African States and Madagascar) - EEC

18

6

1969

Yaounde II Convention AASM-EEC

18

6

1975

Lomé I Convention ACP-EEC

46

9

1980

Lomé II Convention ACP-EEC

58

9

1985

Lomé III Convention ACP-EEC

65

10

1990

Lomé IV Convention ACP-EEC

68

12

1995

Lomé Mid-term review Revised text

70

15


signed in Mauritius ACP-EC

The Fourth convention came into being in 1990 with a life-span of 10 years and is due to end in February 2000. Negotiations for an agreement to succeed the Lomé IV Convention are underway.

Aims of the Lomé Convention.

· Develop trade and accelerate growth of the ACP states

· Promote economic, cultural and social development of ACP states

· Assist ACP states to harmoniously integrate into the global economy

· Assist the private sector of the ACP states

· Support ACP countries' co-operative movements, small and medium scale enterprises and non-governmental organisations

· Promote the role of women in development

· Promote rural development, food security and rational management of national resources

· Remove obstacles preventing individuals and peoples from enjoying their economic, social and cultural rights

The Lomé Convention in Article 5 states that respect for human rights, democratic principles and the rule of law constitute essential elements of the Convention.