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close this bookA Study on the State of Local Resource Mobilisation Amongst DENIVA Member Organizations (DENIVA, 1996, 43 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
View the documentEXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Open this folder and view contents1 INTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contents2 MAJOR FINDINGS
View the document3 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
View the documentAPPENDIX 1: LIST OF WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS
View the documentAPPENDIX 2: LIST OF PERSONS INTERVIEWED
View the documentAPPENDIX 3: REFERENCES
View the documentAPPENDIX 4: EXAMPLES OF MOS's MISSION AND OBJECTIVES
View the documentAPPENDIX 5: DEFINITIONS OF RESOURCE
View the documentAPPENDIX 6: INVENTORY OF INSTITUTIONS WHICH PROVIDE TRAINING RELATED TO LOCAL RESOURCE MOBILISATION
View the documentAPPENDIX 7: LIST OF ACRONYMS
View the documentBACK COVER

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

0.1 The Development Network of Indigenous Voluntary Associations (DENIVA) commissioned a study to establish the existing capacity and interest areas of in particular DENIVA member organisations (MOs) for local resource mobilisation. The study was also set to examine the extent to which the organisations have been able to raise resources locally for running their programmes. In addition, the study was to analyse the various methodologies that have been used for local resource mobilisation and assess their effectiveness. The study was then to draw practical action steps for information sharing and training.

0.2 The capacity and capability to mobilise resources was assessed by the organisation's ability to:

* state the mission and objectives and relate them to the achievements;
* define the term “resource” and what it entails;
* define how they get what they need to carry out their activities;
* approach and relate with well wishers; and
* identify strengths and weaknesses of the existing methods and strategies of resource mobilisation.

0.3 The study was carried out in one month during which 81 organisations including NGOs and CBOs, the private sector, Government departments as well as opinion leaders participated. Purposeful sampling was used to determine which organisations would be visited, and participatory methods like workshops and focused group discussions were employed for data collection.

0.4 Many of the participants in the study did not realise that the term “resource” is more than finance and human. The term includes the financial, human (skills, knowledge and physical labour), information, natural (land, water, forests), materials, technological means at the disposal of the organisation to carry out its programmes.

0.5 The study findings revealed that the organisations knew what they were aiming at. However, many were unable to clearly state their missions and objectives and relate them to their organisations' achievements due to insufficient technical know-how

0.6 Many types of resource mobilisation strategies had been tried by the participating organisations. The study broadly categorised them into direct and indirect methods. Direct methods for raising financial resources were: contributions, membership fees, donations, income generating activities (IGAs), savings and credit, interest on investments and grants and various fund raising activities. Human resources were raised through community mobilisation, labour and motivation, consultancies and governance. Information had been collected through workshops/seminars, training, networking and newsletters. The indirect strategies for resource mobilisation aimed at sensitising the potential well wishers and the public on the aims and objectives of the organisation. These include: proposal writing, promotion materials, media campaigns, personal visits, networking, letter writing, newsletters, pamphlets and brochures. The major resource mobilisation strategies used were proposal writing, mainly to foreign donors and a variety of strategies in community mobilisation for labour and material support.

0.7 A review of the organisations' budgets indicated that CBOS are mainly funded through contributions from own members, some well-wishers and membership fees. The budgets of NGOs were 70-100% foreign funded.

0.8 International donors have been increasingly channelling development assistance through voluntary organisations (VOs) like NGOs and CBOs. They often neglect local sources of funds because raising money from foreign donor agencies seems to be easier. The strategy perpetuated the dependency syndrome and endangered the long term sustainability of indigenous voluntary organisations.

0.9 Voluntary organisations, should seriously explore the possibilities of local resource mobilisation to cover at least their core budgets. Foreign donor support may be sought but as a temporary source of resources. This would enable VOs to plan for sustainability of their programmes and activities.

1.0 Government as a source of resources was under-utilised and could be further exploited in areas of infrastructure, technical expertise and finances, e.g. through receiving part of the development budgets from district councils. Similarly, it is noted that to win government resources, it is important to hold regular meetings with government, so as to understand government policies and share resources in its programmes. There is also need for NGOs to send copies of their work plans and annual reports to relevant government authorities.

1.1 CBOs and NGOs have generally not attempted to build relationships with the private sector, did not either present requests that appeal to them or even suggest visits to the projects. They tend to rely on correspondences rather than on personal approaches and meetings. They gave up quickly particularly when the support is not forthcoming. Consequently, the business community did not take VOs seriously and think most of them were formed to make money. As a result of that many of the organisations think that Ugandans were simply not a charitable society and do not give to charity.

1.2 The study identified potential alternative strategies and sources for local resources including the private sector.

1.3 DENIVA Secretariat should continue to facilitate training the MOs in strategic planning, including project design and implementation so as to enable them explicitly reflect on the organisations' vision, mission and strategies. Capacity building is also recommended in the areas of public relations, business management and lobbying.

1.4 DENIVA MOs should avail enough information to the DENIVA Secretariat regarding their networking interests, activities and programmes, strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. This would enable the Secretariat to propose and timely plan for appropriate actions.