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close this bookGuidelines for Dengue Surveillance and Mosquito Control, 1995 (WHO - OMS, 1995, 112 p.)
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View the documentFOREWORD
View the documentACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Open this folder and view contents1. INTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contents2. VECTOR IDENTIFICATION AND TRANSMISSION OF DF AND DHF
Open this folder and view contents3. SURVEILLANCE - VECTOR SURVEYS
Open this folder and view contents4. CONTROL: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
Open this folder and view contents5. CONTROL: CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL METHODS
Open this folder and view contents6. CONTROL: PERSONAL PROTECTION
Open this folder and view contents7. CONTROL: SPACE SPRAY APPLICATIONS
Open this folder and view contents8. COMMUNITY BASED ACTION
Open this folder and view contents9. LEGISLATION
Open this folder and view contents10. MANAGING OUTBREAKS
Open this folder and view contentsANNEXES
View the documentBACK COVER

FOREWORD

The aim of these guidelines is to provide practical information on the steps for preventing and controlling outbreaks of dengue haemorrhagic fever. The main emphasis is on vector surveillance and control, and priority is given to simple environmental measures which individuals and communities can take to eliminate larval breeding. The strategy used to control adult Aedes mosquitos before and during outbreaks is given within the framework of a comprehensive control approach which includes personal protection measures, space spraying, legislation, and the early recognition and treatment of dengue haemorrhagic fever cases.

These guidelines should be a valuable source of information for those engaged in controlling dengue haemorrhagic fever. Timely action by health personnel, teachers, vector control staff and members of the community, including mothers, can prevent serious illness and death, especially among infants and children.

It is hoped that these guidelines will contribute to the promotion and implementation of improved dengue vector control programmes, resulting in better health of the communities at risk.



S.T Han, MD, Ph.D.
Regional Director