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close this bookWar Wounds with Fractures: A Guide to Surgical Management (ICRC, 1996, 64 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentFOREWORD
View the documentPREFACE
Open this folder and view contentsChapter 1 THE FRACTURE AS PART OF THE WOUND
Open this folder and view contentsChapter 2 HOLDING FRACTURES: THE CHOICE
Open this folder and view contentsChapter 3 PLASTER OF PARIS (POP) TECHNIQUES
Open this folder and view contentsChapter 4 APPLICATION OF TRACTION
Open this folder and view contentsChapter 5 APPLICATION OF EXTERNAL FIXATION
Open this folder and view contentsChapter 6 BONE INFECTION
Open this folder and view contentsChapter 7 BONE GRAFTS AND OTHER PROCEDURES
Open this folder and view contentsChapter 8 MANAGEMENT OF REGIONAL FRACTURES: A SUMMARY

PREFACE

This book addresses the management of war wounds by non-specialist surgeons in situations where resources and expertise are limited. It is intended to be a practical guide whether or not the surgeon has a special training in orthopaedic trauma.

In time of war, the high-technology facilities and specialist surgeons that are taken for granted in peace time may not be available. However, in writing this book, it has been presumed that x-ray is available. This is not always the case.

A surgeon dealing with wounded people has to work with a basic level of technology applying certain basic principles of wound management. Surgeons working for the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) manage all types of war wounds without the possibility of onward referral; because limb wounds are so common, all surgeons must have knowledge of fracture management. Orthopaedic trauma specialists must also change their approach in a war situation; for bone wounds, they must have lower expectations and adapt to lower levels of technology, with less reliance on metallic implants. They must also ensure that, should complications arise after a sophisticated procedure, there is an easy remedy for the next surgeon who sees the patient.

David Rowley.