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close this bookBasic Rules of International Humanitarian Law, (ICRC, 26 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentForeword
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentComponents of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement
View the documentFundamental Principles of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement
View the documentThe distinctive emblem and its value
View the documentFundamental Rules of International Humanitarian Law applicable in Armed Conflicts
View the documentSome Rules of International Humanitarian Law applicable for First Aiders
View the documentMedical Personnel
View the documentSome examples of tasks in which First Aiders could be involved during a conflict
View the documentConclusion
View the documentBibliography
View the documentBack Cover

Back Cover


Historical Background of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement


1859

Solferino - Henry Dunant

1859

1863

International Committee for the relief of military wounded
Dr. L. Appia - Gen. G.H. Dufour - H. Dunant - Dr. T. Maunoir - G. Moynier as from 1876 International Committee at the Red Cross (ICRC)

1863


Geneva International Conference
Establishment of national committees for the relief of military wounded


1864

Geneva Convention
(for the amelioration of the condition of the wounded in armies in the field)

1864

1867

1st International Conference of file Red Cross
(9 Governments, 16 National Committees, ICRC)

1867

1899

Adaptation to maritime warfare of the principles of the Geneva Convention of 1864
(Convention No. III of The Hague)

1899

1906

Revision and development of the Geneva Convention of 1864

1906

1907

Adaptation to maritime warfare of the principles of the Geneva Convention of 1906
(Convention No. X of The Hague)

1907

1919

League of Red Cross Societies
as from 1983: League of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies
as from 1991: International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

1919

1928

Statutes of the International Red Cross
(revised in 1952 and 1986)

1928

1929

Geneva Conventions
Revision and development of the Geneva Convention of 1906 for the amelioration of the condition of the wounded and sick in armed forces in the field Official recognition of the emblem of the red crescent (first used in 1876) Adoption of the Geneva Convention relative to the treatment of prisoners of war

1929

1949

Geneva Conventions
- for the amelioration of the condition of the wounded and sick in armed forces in the field (revision and development of the Geneva Convention of 1929): Convention I
- for the amelioration of the condition of wounded, sick and shipwrecked members of armed forces at sea (revision and development of the Xth Convention of The Hague of 1907): Convention II
- relative to the treatment of prisoners of war (revision and development of the Geneva Convention of 1929): Convention III
- relative to the protection of civilian persons in time of war: Convention IV

1949

1965

Proclamation of the Fundamental Principles of the Red Cross
Humanity, Impartiality, Neutrality, Independence, Voluntary Service, Unity, Universality

1965

1977

Protocols Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 1949
Protection of victims of international armed conflicts: Protocol I
Protection of victims of non-international armed conflicts: Protocol II

1977

1986

Statutes of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement

1986

The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies form, with the National Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement.

A humanitarian institution, the ICRC is the founding body of the Red Cross. As a neutral intermediary in armed conflicts and disturbances, it attempts, either on its own initiative or basing its action on the Geneva Conventions, to provide protection and assistance to the victims of international and civil wars and of internal disturbances and tension, in this way making its contribution to peace in the world.

The Federation's function is to contribute to the development of the humanitarian activities of National Societies, to co-ordinate their relief operations for victims of natural disasters, to care for refugees outside areas of conflict and, in so doing, to promote peace in the world.