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close this bookFirst-year experiences with the Interagency Guidelines for Drug Donations (WHO/EDM, 2000, 51 p.)
close this folder3. Dissemination and uptake of the Guidelines
View the document(introductory text...)
View the documentThe development stage: September 1994 - May 1996
View the documentThe launch: May 1996
View the documentAfter May 1996: dissemination of the Guidelines
View the documentOther publications about drug donations
View the documentConferences at which the Guidelines were discussed
View the documentInternational organizations subscribing to the Guidelines
View the documentCountries and national organizations that have adapted or adopted the Guidelines
View the documentOther country studies on drug donations

Countries and national organizations that have adapted or adopted the Guidelines

Since the launch many organizations and governments have discussed, adopted and/or adapted the Guidelines. This is an ongoing process and quantitative data and percentages are of very little value. The summary below has been prepared through the questionnaire and through other information available to WHO. It is updated to August 1998.

National guidelines were issued or endorsed by the Governments of the following six developed (donor) countries: Australia, Canada, Italy, Netherlands, New Zealand and Norway. In the following 14 recipient countries the Government issued or endorsed national guidelines for drug donations: Armenia, Bolivia, Estonia, Indonesia, Jamaica, Madagascar, Mali, Mongolia, Namibia, Niger, Peru, Sri Lanka, United Republic of Tanzania and Zimbabwe. In all other countries mentioned below, national organizations or groups of organizations discussed, adapted and/or adopted the Guidelines. In all, copies of the interagency guidelines were distributed or local adaptations developed and/or issued in over 40 countries, and the number is still increasing.

Armenia:

The Ministry of Health consulted with donors and issued national guidelines, partly based on the interagency guidelines.

Australia:

The Pharmaceutical Society of Australia issued national guidelines for drug donations, largely based on the interagency guidelines. Rotary Australia, World Vision, the St Vincent de Paul Society, Asian Outreach of Australia and the Macfarlane Burnet Centre started a process to adopt the Guidelines.

Bolivia:

The Unidad de Medicamentos y Laboratorios of the Ministry of Health adopted and translated the Guidelines.

Cameroon:

Sadebay and Horizons Santé (nongovernmental organizations) started a process to adapt the Guidelines. The Presbyterian Medical Institute adopted the Guidelines unchanged.

Canada:

The Government of Canada considers the Guidelines useful and appropriate but did not endorse or approve them since it was not invited to do either. The International Affairs Directorate of Health Canada has brought the Guidelines to the attention of Canadian organizations that are involved with drug donations. Canada does not require an export licence for donated drugs, but will issue one if it is requested by the receiving country. MAP (Canada) started a process to adapt the Guidelines.

Chile:

The Order of Malta (Chile) started a process to adapt the Guidelines.

Croatia:

The Hrvatska Malteska Sluzba (Croatia) adopted the Guidelines unchanged.

Dominican Republic:

The Order of Malta (Dominican Republic) adapted the Guidelines.

El Salvador:

The Order of Malta (El Salvador) started a process to adapt the Guidelines.

Estonia:

The State Agency for Medicines distributed 5,000 copies of the Guidelines.

Ethiopia:

The Medical Mission Sisters adapted the Guidelines.

France:

Tulipe adopted the Guidelines. Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) France disseminated the Guidelines and started a process to adapt them. The Order of Malta (France) also started a review process.

Georgia:

UMCOR (a nongovernmental organization) adopted the Guidelines.

Germany:

DIFÄM adapted and translated the Guidelines into German for use in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, and distributed 6,200 copies. It also wrote reports in about 30 German newsletters, and organized meetings and seminars on the subject. Action Medeor, a non-profit drug supply organization, distributed the Guidelines in German. It also developed a poster presentation for conferences and teaching.

Guinea:

The Order of Malta (Guinea) adopted the Guidelines unchanged.

Haiti:

The Center for Development and Health adopted the Guidelines unchanged.

India:

The Community Development Medical Unit in Calcutta disseminated the Guidelines. The Ramakrishna Mission Ashrama and Alleppey Diocesan Charitable and Social Welfare Society started the process to adopt the Guidelines.

Indonesia:

The Ministry of Health has started to translate the Guidelines into Bahasa with the intention of disseminating them widely within the country. Together with WHO it also submitted the Guidelines to all foreign embassies in Jakarta, urging them to respect the guidelines for any drug donations.

Ireland:

TRÓCAIRE adopted the Guidelines unchanged.

Italy:

The Mario Negri Institute and the Ministry of Health translated the Guidelines into Italian and disseminated them widely within the country.

Jamaica:

The Ministry of Health summarized the Guidelines, which were published as guidelines for donations of pharmaceuticals.

Kenya:

The Ministry of Health and the Kenya National Drug Policy Implementation Programme started a process to adopt and translate the Guidelines.

Lithuania:

The Humanitarian Commission of the Ministry of Health started a process to adopt the Guidelines, and changed the national drug policy accordingly. Maltos Ordino Pagalbos (Lithuania) adapted the Guidelines.

Madagascar:

The Ministry of Health adopted the guidelines.

Malawi:

The Christian Health Association of Malawi originally used the guidelines of the Christian Medical Commission. It distributed 200 copies of the interagency guidelines to hospitals and clinics and started a process of adaptation to the new guidelines.

Mali:

The Direction Nationale de Santé Publique adapted the Guidelines.

Mongolia:

The Agency for Quality Assurance of Biological Preparations and Medical Care has started a process to prepare national donation guidelines.

Namibia:

The Ministry of Health and Social Services developed national guidelines but often refers to the Guidelines as well.

Netherlands:

The Wemos Foundation, supported by the Ministry for Development Cooperation and the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport, coordinated the Dutch Working Group on Donations with 18 organizations subscribing to the Guidelines, including Nefarma, the Dutch pharmaceutical manufacturers' association. Additions were made, but the basis of the WHO Guidelines remains unchanged. A poster presentation was developed for conferences entitled "A Call for Good Donation Practices". Memisa Medicus Mundi started a process to adopt the Guidelines.

New Zealand:

The Pharmaceutical Society developed its own guidelines, and advised all pharmacists about their responsibilities for donating drugs overseas.

Niger:

The Ministry of Health issued guidelines for drug donations, based on the Guidelines, and informed donors about these guidelines in an official letter.

Norway:

The Government issued national guidelines for drug donations.

Panama:

The Order of Malta (Panama) adopted the Guidelines unchanged.

Peru:

The Centro de Obras Sociales translated and distributed the Guidelines.

Philippines:

The Order of Malta (Philippines) and Sisters of the Poor adopted the Guidelines unchanged.

Poland:

The Ministry of Health and Social Welfare started a process to adapt the Guidelines. The Institute of Haematology and Blood Transfusion translated the Guidelines into Polish.

Republic of Moldova:

The Association for Drug Information translated and distributed the Guidelines. It also carried out a questionnaire survey.

Romania:

In the United Kingdom about 700 nongovernmental organizations dealing with Romania received copies of the Guidelines.

Spain:

The nongovernmental organization Prosalus adapted and printed the Guidelines for Spanish-speaking countries.

Sri Lanka:

All potential donors received a copy of the Guidelines.

United Kingdom:

At least one meeting was held by OXFAM to disseminate the Guidelines to nongovernmental organizations active in emergency relief operations in Romania.

United Republic of Tanzania:

The Ministry of Health summarized the Guidelines in a small booklet and disseminated them to all hospitals.

United States:

The United States Department of Defense and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), even before the issue of the Guidelines, took up the draft. As a result, all product shipments to locations abroad must have a minimum 12-month product dating. Large numbers of copies of the Guidelines were distributed among donors and consolidators during three national meetings on the subject (see under "Conferences"). The United States Pharmacopoeia has also adopted the Guidelines. In April 1998 the US/NGO Pharmaceutical Product Donation Steering Committee, composed of eight pharmaceutical companies and seven private voluntary organizations, issued a Statement of Principles on the Provision and Distribution of Donated Medicines and Medical Supplies for Disaster and Humanitarian Relief. The Catholic Medical Mission Board started a process to adapt the Guidelines. The United Armenian Fund adapted and translated the Guidelines.

Yugoslavia:

The Order of Malta (Yugoslavia) translated the Guidelines.

Zimbabwe:

The Ministry of Health and Welfare issued national guidelines for drug donations, largely based on the Guidelines. The Commonwealth Pharmaceutical Association (Zimbabwe) adopted the Guidelines.