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close this bookThe Global Greenhouse Regime. Who Pays? (UNU, 1993, 382 p.)
View the documentList of contributors
View the documentPreface
View the documentAcknowledgements
close this folderPart I Measuring responsibility
close this folder1 Introduction
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentThe greenhouse effect
View the documentWhat was decided at Rio?
View the documentProtocol negotiating difficulties
View the documentKey issues for climate change negotiations
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close this folder2 The basics of greenhouse gas indices
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View the documentApples and oranges
View the documentImplications
View the documentConclusion: indices do matter
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close this folder3 Assessing emissions: five approaches compared
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentComprehensiveness compared
View the documentAccuracy by category
View the documentRegional and national emissions by source
View the documentConclusions
View the documentReferences
View the documentAppendix A: Estimates of greenhouse gas emissions
View the documentAppendix B: Calculating cumulative and current emissions
close this folder4 Who pays (to solve the problem and how much)?
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentIndices of allocation: a brief review
View the documentAccountability
View the documentEquity and efficiency
View the documentConclusion
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close this folderPart II Resource transfers
close this folder5 North-South carbon abatement costs
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentClimate change convention
View the documentMethod overview
View the documentImplications for the South
View the documentNotes and references
close this folder6 North-South transfer
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentObligation to pay indices
View the documentRedistribution of incremental cost
View the documentBenchmarks
View the documentUN scale of payments
View the documentFinancing mechanisms
View the documentConclusion
View the documentNotes and references
close this folder7 Insuring against sea level rise
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentInsurability of losses
View the documentOil pollution
View the documentNuclear damage
View the documentImplications
View the documentThe insurance scheme proposed by AOSIS
View the documentThe Climate Change Convention
View the documentNotes and references
View the documentAppendix: Scheme proposed by AOSIS for inclusion in the Climate Change Convention
close this folderPart III National greenhouse gas reduction cost curves
close this folder8 Integrating ecology and economy in India
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentEmissions inventory
View the documentEnergy efficiency and fuel substitution
View the documentEmissions and sequestration from forest biomass
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View the documentReferences
close this folder9 Carbon abatement potential in West Africa
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentLong-term energy and carbon emissions scenarios
View the documentOptions for rational energy use and carbon conservation
View the documentEconomic opportunities for implementation
View the documentPolicy issues for the region
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close this folder10 Abatement of carbon dioxide emissions in Brazil
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View the documentBrazil energy economy
View the documentEnergy subsector analyses
View the documentChanging land-use trends
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close this folder11 Thailand's demand side management initiative: a practical response to global warming
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentEnd-use energy efficiency policies
View the documentCosts and benefits of the DSM master plan
View the documentCO2 reductions from the DSM Plan
View the documentWhy should other developing countries adopt DSM?
View the documentThe role of the multilateral development banks
View the documentConclusions
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close this folder12 Carbon abatement in Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentEnergy-environment nexus
View the documentScenarios for the future
View the documentCountry results
View the documentPolicy implications
View the documentConclusion
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close this folder13 Greenhouse gas emission abatement in Australia
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentAbatement of energy sector emissions
View the documentEconomic impact of abatement strategies
View the documentNon-energy emission abatement
View the documentAustralia's international role
View the documentCarbon taxes, externalities and other policy instruments
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close this folderPart IV Conclusion
close this folder14 Constructing a global greenhouse regime
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentConditionality and additionality
View the documentTechnology transfer
View the documentMulti-pronged approach
View the documentImplementation procedures
View the documentRegional building blocks
View the documentNorth-'South' conflicts
View the documentConclusion
View the documentNotes and references
close this folderAppendix: The Climate change convention
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentBackground
View the documentClimate change convention
View the documentArticle 1. Definitions
View the documentArticle 2. Objective
View the documentArticle 3. Principles
View the documentArticle 4 Commitments
View the documentArticle 5. Research and systematic observation
View the documentArticle 6. Education, training and public awareness
View the documentArticle 7. Conference of the Parties
View the documentArticle 8. Secretariat
View the documentArticle 9. Subsidiary body for scientific and technological advice
View the documentArticle 10. Subsidiary Body for implementation
View the documentArticle 11. Financial mechanism
View the documentArticle 12. Communication of information related to implementation
View the documentArticle 13. Resolution of questions regarding implementation
View the documentArticle 14. Settlement of disputes
View the documentArticle 15. Amendments to the Convention
View the documentArticle 16. Adoption and amendment of annexes to the Convention
View the documentArticle 17. Protocols
View the documentArticle 18. Right to vote
View the documentArticle 19. Depositary
View the documentArticle 20. Signature
View the documentArticle 21. Interim arrangements
View the documentArticle 22. Ratification, acceptance, approval or accession
View the documentArticle 23. Entry into force
View the documentArticle 24. Reservations
View the documentArticle 25. Withdrawal
View the documentArticle 26. Authentic texts

References

1 IPCC (1992). 1992 IPCC Supplement. February

2 Ibid

3 Hall, D, Mynick, H and Williams, R (1991). 'Cooling the Greenhouse with Biomass Energy'. Nature, September 5; Hall, D, Mynick, H and Williams, R (1991).'Alternative Roles for Biomass in Coping with Greenhouse Warming'. Science and Global Security, Volume 2, pp 1-39

4 Reddy, A (1991).'Barriers to Improvements in Energy Efficiency'. Energy Policy, December, pp 953-961

5 Mitra A P (eds.) Global Change: Greenhouse Gas Emissions in India, A Preliminary Report., Scientific Report No. 1. Prepared under the auspices of Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi, June 1991

6 Boden, T. Sepanski, R and Stoss, F (Eds). Trends '91: A Compendium of Data on Global Change. ORNL Pub. No. ORNL/CDIAC-46, pp 442-445

7 Sathaye, J and Ketoff, A (1991). CO2 Emissions from Developing Countries: Better Understanding the Role of Energy in the Long Term. Volume 1: Summary. February, LBL-29507

8 Bureau of Costs and Prices (1986). Energy Audit of the Cement Industry. Ministry of Industry, Government of India, New Delhi

9 Parikh, J. Gokarn, S and Barua, A (1992). Climate Change and India's Energy Policy Options. Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, February. Report prepared for the Rockefeller Foundation

10 Government of India, Bureau of Costs and Prices (1988). Towards a New Energy Policy, Delhi

11 Reddy, A, Sumithra, G Balachandra, P and D'Sa, A (1991). 'A DevelopmentFocused End-Use-Oriented Electricity Scenario for Karnataka'. Economic and Political Weekly, April 6 and April 13

12 Mongia, N. Bhatia, R. Sathaye, J and Mongia, P (1991). Cost of Reducing CO2 Emissions from India. Energy Policy, pp 978-986, December

13 Nadel, S. Kothari, V and Gopinath, S (1991). Opportunities for Improving EndUse Electricity Efficiency in India. Report prepared by American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy for the World Bank and US Agency for International Development, November

14 Reddy, et al. (1991), op. cit. (Reference 11)

15 Reddy, A (1981).'A Strategy for Resolving India's Oil Crisis'. Current Science, Vol. 50, No. 2, pp 50-53

16 Sathaye, J (1992). Carbon Emissions from Brazil, India and China. Presentation to the EMF-12 meeting in Washington DC, May

17 Reddy, A (1987). On the Loss and Degradation of Karnataka's Forests. Paper presented at the International Conference on Tropical Forestry, 1-2 July, Bellagio

18 World Resources Institute 1990. World Resources 1990-91. New York, Oxford University Press

19 Kaul, O L (1991). Forest Biomass Burning in India. TERI Information Service on Global Warming, New Delhi, 2(2): 2-17

20 Saxena, N C (1989).'Forestry and Rural Development'. South Asia Journal, Vol. 3, Nos. 1 and 2, pp 70-89

21 Ravindranath, N H. Somashekhar, B S and Gadgil, M (1992). Forests: Case Studies from Seven Developing Countries, Volume 3: India and China, August. LBL Report 32759

22 Hall, et al. (1991a,b) op. cit. (Reference 3)

23 Reddy (1991) op. cit. (Reference 4)

24 Reddy, A K N (1992). Has the World Bank Greened? Paper prepared for the Second Edition of the Green Globe Yearbook, Fridtjof Nansen Institute, Norway, September

25 Rajabapaiah, P. Jayakumar, S and Reddy, A (1993). 'Biogas Electricity - The Pura Village Case Study', Chapter 18, pp 787-816 in Johanson, T. Kelly, H. Reddy, A and Williams, R. (eds.) Renewable Energy: Sources for Fuels and Electricity, Island Press, Washington DC