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close this bookObstacles to Tree Planting in Arid and Semi-Arid lands: Comparative Case Studies from India and Kenya (UNU, 1982, 63 p.)
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentSummary and conclusions
close this folder1. Introduction and purpose of the study
View the documentThe United Nations University programme
View the documentObjective of the study
View the documentChoice of study areas
View the documentDefinitions and distribution of arid and semi-arid lands
View the documentBenefits of trees-the "4-E Package"
View the documentRecent trends in forestry
close this folder2. India
View the documentForestry policy, strategy, and organization
View the documentSelection of the study area
View the documentResources and needs for forest products and services
View the documentOvercoming the major obstacles to tree planting
View the documentThe Gujarat community forestry project
close this folder3. Kenya
View the documentLand Tenure and use
View the documentDefinition and distribution of the arid and semi-arid zones
View the documentGovernment policy on arid zone development
View the documentForestry organization and policy
View the documentRural afforestation and extension
View the documentNeeds for forest products and services in the arid zone
View the documentCurrent programmes of afforestation in the arid zone
View the documentOvercoming the major obstacles to tree planting
close this folder4. India and Kenya: Comparisons and contrasts
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentEnvironmental and technical factors
View the documentInstitutional factors
View the documentSocial and economic factors
View the documentAppendix 1. Outline of a four-week training course in community forestry and extension at the commonwealth forestry institute Oxford
View the documentAppendix 2. Proposal for a 35-hour course in agro-forestry for agricultural students (third-year degree)
View the documentAppendix 3. Summer courses at the commonwealth forestry institute, Oxford
View the documentReferences
View the documentOther UNU publications

Acknowledgements

The field work for this study was undertaken during sabbatical leave granted by Oxford University authorities to the author. Acknowledgement is given to the General Board of the University and to the Head of the Forestry Department.

Many people facilitated this study by giving up time for office discussions or field tours and by providing published and unpublished material as well as personal hospitality To all of them the United Nations University and the author express their thanks. Of particular help were Mr R.D.H. Rowe (World Bank, Delhi), Mr B.K. Jhala (Gujarat Forest Department), and the staff of UNESCO in Nairobi and Ngurunit (Kenya). Sections of the text concerned with sociological aspects were contributed or revised by Professors D. Brokensha and P. Castri (University of California).