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close this bookSustainable Development and Persons with Disabilities: The Process of Self-Empowerment (ADF, 1995, 117 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentAbout the author
View the documentForeword
View the documentForeword
View the documentAbbreviations
View the documentSources and acknowledgements
close this folderSection I: Understanding and perception
View the document(introduction...)
close this folderChapter 1: Introduction
View the documentObjectives of this guide
View the documentWho may use the guide
View the documentLanguage and liberation
View the documentDebate and discussion must continue
View the documentChapter 2: An integrated approach to sustainable development for persons with disability
close this folderChapter 3: The enabling environment: SAPs, development and disability
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentAction guidelines
View the documentAppendix 1: Structural adjustment programme (SAP) - The experience of Zambia
close this folderChapter 4: Community-based rehabilitation
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentPractices in relation to the PWDs
View the documentWhat is CBR?
View the documentCase studies
View the documentA general assessment of CBR: Possibilities and limitations
View the documentAction guidelines
close this folderSection II: Building economic self-reliance
View the document(introduction...)
close this folderChapter 5: Building economic self-reliance
View the documentThe importance of self-reliance
View the documentEmployment options for PWDs
View the documentGroup versus individually designed and managed IGPs
View the documentIGPs at the crossroads of gender and class
View the documentAction guidelines
close this folderChapter 6: Income generating project planning
View the documentThe importance of planning
View the documentThe experience of a clothing manufacturing project run by a PWD organisation
View the documentOther lessons to learn from other experiences
View the documentRecommendations of the entebbe workshop
View the documentWhat is involved in successful planning
View the documentWhat kind of information is needed for planning?
View the documentWhat do we do with all this information?
View the documentAction guidelines
close this folderChapter 7: Implementation and resource mobilisation
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentSustainability
View the documentResource mobilisation
View the documentRunning an enterprise
View the documentSome case studies of projects run by PWDs
View the documentAction guidelines
View the documentAppendix 1: Revolving loan scheme (RLS)
View the documentAppendix 2: The Entebbe workshop resolution con RLS
close this folderChapter 8: Monitoring and evaluation: Measuring the success of IGPs
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentMonitoring
View the documentEvaluation
View the documentMethodology of monitoring and evaluation
View the documentAction guidelines
close this folderChapter 9: Capacity building: Skills training and institution building
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentEmpowerment
View the documentThe pedagogy of disability training
View the documentWomen with disabilities and capacity building for IGPs
View the documentAction guidelines
close this folderSection III: Lobbying, networking and building alliances
View the document(introduction...)
close this folderChapter 10: Strategies for lobbying, networking and building alliances
View the documentPWDs are their own principal change agents
View the documentLobbying, advocacy and networking
View the documentBroad alliances
View the documentAction guidelines
close this folderNotes and references
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentADF board of directors

Who may use the guide

There are several categories of possible readership. As indicated earlier, this book is not strictly a "manual," and yet, there is information, especially on matters related to building economic self-reliance (Section II of the book), that can be useful to the Persons With Disabilities engaged in income generating projects. Wherever relevant, each chapter, therefore, ends with 'Action Guidelines" for Persons with Disability.

However, the book is aimed at a broader audience. The main argument of the book supports a strategy of self-empowerment of the PWDs. But the PWDs cannot advance this strategy without allies and a support base in the families and communities in which they live. Hence, community leaders may also find the book a useful source of information and principles by which to guide their action.

A third category of readership includes the professionals engaged in disability rehabilitation work. The contribution of professionals is recognised, but in general, the guide takes a critical view on isolating professional work from the overall social context, and advocates an approach to their work that is empowering of the PWDs rather than one that disempowers them.

A fourth category of readership may be found within those departments of Government that deal With PWDs. They may be spread among different Ministries of Government, both at the Central and Local levels. Hence, where relevant, the chapters end with "Action Guidelines" which they might find useful. A fifth category of readers are the Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) engaged in their various functional interaction with PWDs.

The sixth category of readers who might find the guide useful are organisations within the UN system (such as the ILO, WHO, UNICEF and UNDP) and inter-governmental organisations such as the OAU. And the seventh category of readers who would find some sections of the guide useful (e.g. those dealing with advocacy and networking) are the international NGOs representing or relating with PWDs, such as the Disabled Peoples' International, Rehabilitation International, the World Blind Union and the World Federation of the Deaf

With such a broad audience, obviously not everything in the book is of relevance to everybody. In other words, the book can be read in parts. However, for a certain kind of readership it may be useful to read through the entire document because there is a certain sequential logic that connects chapter one through chapter ten. There is an argument built as the chapters unfold. Indeed, readers must be warned that they might find certain positions in the book controversial, even argumentative. This is deliberate. It is to foster debate. There is no human progress without debate. Past knowledge must be challenged by new ideas, new ways of looking at reality, new visions.

This, and the fact that the guide tries to provide for a broad readership, has inevitably affected the language and "tone" of the book. Clearly, the document could not linguistically be reduced to a "minimum common denominator" to the level of the most marginalised among the PWDs. The Entebbe Workshop participants came from varied backgrounds, but as Nelson Isiko was to point out, the very poor were not there. The language of discourse was, at times, conceptually very high. This guide has tried to simplify some of these concepts, but it has retained the conceptual richness of the discussion. Concepts are important tools for debate, and the PWDs would find some of the language used in the book a useful means of dialogue when discussing matters of concern to them with those who make and administer government and inter-governmental policies.