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close this bookSustainable Development and Persons with Disabilities: The Process of Self-Empowerment (ADF, 1995, 117 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentAbout the author
View the documentForeword
View the documentForeword
View the documentAbbreviations
View the documentSources and acknowledgements
close this folderSection I: Understanding and perception
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close this folderChapter 1: Introduction
View the documentObjectives of this guide
View the documentWho may use the guide
View the documentLanguage and liberation
View the documentDebate and discussion must continue
View the documentChapter 2: An integrated approach to sustainable development for persons with disability
close this folderChapter 3: The enabling environment: SAPs, development and disability
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View the documentAction guidelines
View the documentAppendix 1: Structural adjustment programme (SAP) - The experience of Zambia
close this folderChapter 4: Community-based rehabilitation
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View the documentPractices in relation to the PWDs
View the documentWhat is CBR?
View the documentCase studies
View the documentA general assessment of CBR: Possibilities and limitations
View the documentAction guidelines
close this folderSection II: Building economic self-reliance
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close this folderChapter 5: Building economic self-reliance
View the documentThe importance of self-reliance
View the documentEmployment options for PWDs
View the documentGroup versus individually designed and managed IGPs
View the documentIGPs at the crossroads of gender and class
View the documentAction guidelines
close this folderChapter 6: Income generating project planning
View the documentThe importance of planning
View the documentThe experience of a clothing manufacturing project run by a PWD organisation
View the documentOther lessons to learn from other experiences
View the documentRecommendations of the entebbe workshop
View the documentWhat is involved in successful planning
View the documentWhat kind of information is needed for planning?
View the documentWhat do we do with all this information?
View the documentAction guidelines
close this folderChapter 7: Implementation and resource mobilisation
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentSustainability
View the documentResource mobilisation
View the documentRunning an enterprise
View the documentSome case studies of projects run by PWDs
View the documentAction guidelines
View the documentAppendix 1: Revolving loan scheme (RLS)
View the documentAppendix 2: The Entebbe workshop resolution con RLS
close this folderChapter 8: Monitoring and evaluation: Measuring the success of IGPs
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentMonitoring
View the documentEvaluation
View the documentMethodology of monitoring and evaluation
View the documentAction guidelines
close this folderChapter 9: Capacity building: Skills training and institution building
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentEmpowerment
View the documentThe pedagogy of disability training
View the documentWomen with disabilities and capacity building for IGPs
View the documentAction guidelines
close this folderSection III: Lobbying, networking and building alliances
View the document(introduction...)
close this folderChapter 10: Strategies for lobbying, networking and building alliances
View the documentPWDs are their own principal change agents
View the documentLobbying, advocacy and networking
View the documentBroad alliances
View the documentAction guidelines
close this folderNotes and references
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentADF board of directors

What is involved in successful planning

This depends on the kind of project one is embarking upon. Naturally, a large enterprise like the clothing factory discussed above requires a very different level of planning than a small one like a bakery. One cannot generalise.

Secondly, it is important not to present "planning" as some special activity that only "experts" can do. If it were presented in this light then PWDs (like other marginalised people) would forever be disempowered. They would never feel confident enough to embark on a project without having experts rule their lives. For sure, there are aspects of planning that require a certain amount of professional "expertise," especially for large projects.

The carrying out of a proper feasibility or market study is an example. Another is a technical evaluation of equipment before actually purchasing it. However, the important thing is not to be intimidated by the "experts."

Planning is not something that experts do. The experts may have knowledge about certain aspects of the enterprise (such as the technical, the financial or the marketing aspect), but they do not know all. For example, they would not know the human dimension of the enterprise. And this, when you are dealing with a group of disabled people or a situation that demands a certain degree of human sensitiveness, is an extremely important dimension. "Experts," especially those who deal with the financial and technical matters (as against those who deal with "labour" issues), are often insensitive to the human aspect. PLANNING IS NOT A SCIENCE. It has to deal with the human aspect just as much as with the technical.

So "experts" should not plan alone. It is only the owner/manager of the enterprise who has finally to put all things together after the "experts" have carried out their analysis and presented their reports. At the end of the day, if things go wrong, you as owner or manager are responsible, not the "experts."