Cover Image
close this bookThe Packaging of Fruit Juice and Non-Carbonated Fruit Drinks (CDI, 1998, 87 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentGLOSSARY
View the documentForeword
View the documentI. INTRODUCTION
close this folderII. METHODOLOGY FOR CORRECT CHOICE OF PACKAGING
close this folderA - GENERAL APPROACH
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View the document1. The target market (segment)
View the document2. Cost of packaging
View the document3. Investment capacity of the promoter
close this folderB - EXAMPLE OF PACKAGING SELECTION
View the document1. Wide distribution product (informal distribution)
View the document2. Top of the range product (cold chain distribution)
close this folderIII. THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF PACKAGING
View the document(introduction...)
close this folderA - SHORT SHELF-LIFE FRESH PRODUCTS
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View the document1. Plastic bottle
View the document2. Plastic drum
View the document3. Pre-formed plastic cup
View the document4. Pre-formed pouch
View the document5. Gable-top carton box
close this folderB - LONG SHELF-LIFE PRODUCTS WITH PRESERVATIVES
View the document(introduction...)
View the document6. Polyethylene film pouch
View the document7. PVC bottle
View the document8. PET bottle
close this folderC - LONG SHELF-LIFE PRODUCTS WITH HEAT TREATMENT PACKAGING
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View the document9. Thermoformed plastic cup
View the document10. Doypack aluminium coated bag
View the document11. Cheerpack aluminium coated bag
View the document12. Glass bottle
View the document13. Gable-top carton box
View the document14. Tin can
View the document15. Metallic cup
close this folderD - LONG SHELF LIFE STERILISED PRODUCTS (ASEPTIC PACKAGING)
View the document(introduction...)
View the document16. ''Brick'' carton box
View the document17. Plastic pouch
View the document18. Thermoformed plastic cup
View the document19. Plastic bottle
View the document20. Bag in box
View the document21. ''Cartocan''
View the documentIV - IMPACT ON THE ENVIRONMENT
close this folderANNEXES
View the documentANNEX 1 - BIBLIOGRAPHICAL REFERENCES
View the documentANNEX 2 - DIFFERENT FRUIT DRINKS DEFINITIONS
View the documentANNEX 3 - LIST OF PRESERVATIVES
View the documentANNEX 4 - SOME SUPPLIERS OF PACKAGING MATERIALS IN EUROPE
View the documentANNEX 5 - SOME SUPPLIERS OF PACKAGING MACHINES
View the documentANNEX 6 - SCHEDULE OF SPECIALISED EUROPEAN AND AFRICAN EXHIBITIONS
View the documentANNEX 7 - LIST OF SOME INTERNATIONAL OR PROFESSIONAL ORGANISATIONS LINKED TO PACKAGING
View the documentANNEX 8 - CDI, A TOOL FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ENTERPRISES IN ACP COUNTRIES
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(introduction...)

Definition:

These products can be kept at room temperature for several months thanks to the presence of chemical preservatives. Most of these products are mainly fruit drinks with addition of sugar and water.

Principle:

This type of treatment is mainly used for fruit drinks with a greater degree of dilution; the pH being often greater than 5, it is necessary to decrease it to less than 4.2. The preservative is usually added before pasteurisation and processing is carried out at low temperature. The preservatives are selected on the basis of two criteria:

· The prevention of the development of bacteria, mould or yeasts in the product.
· The prevention of the effects of oxidation on the product.

Advantages:

· Simple technology and installation
· Possibility of packaging for low output production (reduced initial investment)
· Possibility to choose cost-effective packaging materials (PE bag)
· Product can be stored at room temperature

Disadvantage:

· Use of chemical additives (see annex 3)