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close this bookContamination of Drinking-Water by Arsenic in Bangladesh: A Public Health Emergency (WHO, 2000, 16 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentExtent of exposure in the population
Open this folder and view contentsLong-term health effects of exposure
View the documentClassifying arsenic in drinking-water as a public health emergency
Open this folder and view contentsEmergency intervention programme
View the documentLessons to be learned
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentRésumé - Contamination de l'eau de boisson par de l'arsenic au Bangladesh: une urgence de santé publique
View the documentResumen - Contaminación del agua de bebida con arsénico en Bangladesh: una emergencia de salud pública
View the documentReferences
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References

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