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close this bookBetter Farming Series 16 - Roots and Tubers (FAO - INADES, 1977, 58 p.)
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View the documentRoots and tubers
close this folderCassava
View the documentDescription of the plant
View the documentDifferent kinds of cassava
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View the documentThe place of cassava in a crop rotation
View the documentPreparing the soil for cassava
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close this folderThe use of cassava in food
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close this folderYams
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View the documentThere are many varieties of yam
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View the documentThe place of yams in a crop rotation
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close this folderThe use of yams in food
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View the documentFresh and mashed yams
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close this folderSweet potatoes
close this folderDescription of the plant
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View the documentVarieties of sweet potato
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View the documentYields of sweet potatoes and storing
View the documentSweet potatoes in human food
close this folderTania and taro
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View the documentTania or Xanthosoma
View the documentTaro or cocoyam (Colocasia)
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Yields of sweet potatoes and storing

YIELDS

Depending on the varieties of sweet potato and on the way they are grown, yields vary from 4 to 7 tons per hectare on average. On a modern and well- cared- for plantation, yields may be much higher, and may even be more than 20 tons per hectare.

STORING

The length of time for which sweet potatoes can be kept differs with the varieties and the harvesting season. If they are harvested in dry weather, the tubers may be stored for 2 or 3 months.

But part of the harvest may be destroyed by rot during storage. Damaged tubers are most quickly attacked. Damp conditions encourage rot.

To prevent rot, dry the tubers in the sun for a time after harvesting.

For good keeping, the tubers of sweet potatoes should be harvested when they are quite ripe, when the stems and leaves have turned yellow. Take care not to damage the tubers. Remove all diseased and damaged tubers. Dry the tubers in the sun. Store them under cover in a dark, dry, cool, well- aired place. Put them on dry ground or on boards supported on posts, and do not heap them up too much.