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close this bookDisaster Reports Number 2: Jamaica, St. Vincent, and Dominica (PAHO)
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close this folderNatural disaster and communicable diseases
View the document1. Definition
View the document2. Experiences with communicable disease following natural disasters in developing countries
close this folder3. Theoretical framework
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View the document3.1. Introduction of a new pathogenic agent
close this folder3.2. A change in susceptibility of the population by or because of the disaster
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View the document3.2.1. Migration of rural populations to congested areas:
View the document3.2.2. Migration of urban populations to rural areas:
View the document3.2.3. Immigration of susceptibles to disaster-affected areas:
View the document3.2.4. Accelerated transmission of local pathogens:
close this folderThree disaster experiences in the Caribbean St. Vincent : volcanic eruptions, April 1979(37)
close this folder1. Background information
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View the document1.1. The volcano
View the document2. The disaster: Volcanic eruption followed by massive evacuation(41)
close this folder3. The surveillance system
View the document3.1. Background information
View the document3.2. Emergency surveillance for infectious diseases in evacuation centers
View the document3.3. Surveillance for admissions to the medical and pediatric wards of the Kingstown General Hospital (KGH)
View the document3.4. Surveillance of casualty department visits
View the document3.5. Surveillance of environmental health at evacuation centers
View the document3.6. Surveillance of public health activities in or/for evacuation centers
View the document3.7. Routine surveillance
close this folder4. Results and analysis
close this folder4.1. Emergency surveillance in evacuation centers
View the document4.1.1. Functioning of system
View the document4.1.2. Report a and analysis
View the document4.1.3. Outbreaks
View the document4.2. Hospital surveillance - Total number of admissions, admissions to pediatric ward, admissions to medical ward(s)
View the document4.3. Surveillance in the casualty department
View the document4.4. Surveillance of environmental health in evacuation centers
close this folder4.5. Surveillance of public health activities in centers
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View the document4.5.1. Staff
View the document4.5.2. Vaccine
View the document4.5.3. Record keeping
View the document4.6. Routine surveillance
close this folderJamaica floods, June 1979
close this folder1. Background information (48-50)
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View the document1.1. The floods
View the document2. Surveillance system
close this folder3. Results and analysis
View the document3.1. System
View the document3.2. Results
close this folder4. Specific surveillance
View the document4.1. Disease-specific surveillance
View the document4.2. Hospital surveillance
View the document4.3. Environmental health activities
View the document4.4. Water supplies
close this folderDominica hurricane, September 1979
close this folder1. Background information
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View the document1.1. Hurricane David, with almost complete destruction of the island(57-58)
View the document2. The surveillance system
close this folder3. Results and analysis
View the document3.1. Operation of the system
View the document3.2. Casualty and health center surveillance
View the document3.3. Hospital admission surveillance
close this folder3.4. Laboratory surveillance
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View the document3.4.1. Typhoid fever
View the document3.4.2. Amebic dysentery
View the document3.4.3. Shigellosis
View the document3.5. Environmental health and public health activities
View the document3.6. Routine surveillance
close this folderIII: Summary of practical experiences: Lessons learned
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View the document1. Regarding the surveillance system
View the document2. Regarding the capacity to detect outbreaks
View the document3. Regarding the occurrence of outbreaks
View the document4. Regarding the overall usefullness of post-disaster epidemiologic surveillance
close this folderAnnex A - Control of infectious diseases following natural disasters
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View the document1. Epidemiologic surveillance
View the document2. The most immediate effect of most disasters is on environmental health
View the document3. the third element is the immediate resumption or the strengthening of routine public health programs
close this folderAnnex B - Disease control and disaster-relief
View the document1. Disaster-relief activities should in no way be exempt from the attention of disease control programs
View the document2. At the same time full advantage should be taken of disaster relief and personnel to obtain longterm impact on disease occurrence and control
View the documentReferences